Reading Harder: Space Books by Authors of Color

The last day of March! April’s promise of Spring is a lot more reliable than March.  Plus, it’s Easter, which is usually the first holiday of the year that I spend with my sister and her family.  My son is complaining that it has been too long since we saw them in October, and I agree.  He doesn’t yet understand how hard his cousin is going to beat the pants off him in Nintendo when we all play together.

Have I made the Northeast look appealing yet?

I’m pleased with how much reading I got done in the dead of winter.  Because of my overzealous reading I am not as far into the challenge as I could be, but the point is to read harder, not blow through the list like the gifted kid whose parents refuse to move him up a grade because he needs social skills.

Also, books about space. Not usually my favorite.  I read them in the interest of sci fi and understanding the classics and the genres, but it holds little appeal to me.  I get why we do space exploration, but I have no interest in going out past my atmosphere in a little tube.  Naw.  At least on an airplane we can make a landing without bursting into flame, right?  I like the ground.   I am much more excited to read historical romances by authors of color.  Those have been downloaded onto my Kindle since before this challenge came out.

A Book by an Author of Color Set In/About Space

binti.jpg

Binti, Nnedi Okorafor

(Winner of a Hugo and a Nebula, of course)

I know, I know, this is part of a trilogy.  Honestly the bits are so short I don’t know why it isn’t all one volume.  I love Dr. Okorafor after Who Fears Death and I chose to listen to one of her shorts as read on the podcast,  LeVar Burton Reads.  I was a Reading Rainbow kid back in the day and that’s something that never changes.  So, I guess I should say, I am a Reading Rainbow kid.  I think LeVar could even romance my six year old somewhat reluctant reader to watch.  (I say somewhat because dude is showing a solid interest in comic books.  Just because it isn’t my dreams of Roald Dahl doesn’t mean it’s not important.  In the books department, he’s not like his mother, but he’s not me in sports either and that’s a good thing).

My favorite in this short book is the narrator. She is a powerful female going after her dreams of going far away to study math and science, at Oomza University, despite her family’s pressure to stay home.  And even on the spaceship over she doesn’t fit in:  She is the only human from her tribe on the ship, but also then is the only one who survives the takeover of the ship by the Meduse, a race with a vendetta against Oomza University, save for the captain so they can get there.  She bridges the communication gap and works out of her comfort zone to heal their vendetta, and not only because it is to her benefit.

I love strong females with powers that they use for the ultimate good. Dr. Okorafor’s heroines are special women who beat the odds, and even when you put them in a less familiar settings, I can always get emotionally involved with them.  Also, Dr. Okorafor has Binti solve the issue relationally instead of just kicking anyone’s ass until they are too scared of her to bother her.  It’s a solution I can get behind.  She uses her brain and relationships.  She uses something special and unique to her culture that also helps a completely different race.  Very cool.

babel 17.jpg

Babel-17, Samuel R. Delany

This epic pulpy cover is way more interesting than the boring one on my Kindle/Audible app.  And it would have changed my expectations of the novel more than the geometric cover:

babel-17 kindle.jpg

Like two entirely different books, right?  I thought this book was way more literary/artistic than something pulpy.  It was one of those science fiction books with heavy philosophical underpinnings.  This one specifically was about how language shapes thought and vice versa.  I have been reading more pulp lately while I am learning to write it, and this was definitely not the content of the scanned in pulp mags I was reading. And is that supposed to be the heroine Rydra Wong on the cover?

This book is beautifully written, with poignant metaphors and description I don’t expect to encounter in sci-fi.  I don’t know enough about the time in which it was written to really talk about how it compares to the sci fi books of the time in this aspect, I just enjoyed the striking images as I read.

However, reading it was like dreaming: some parts were really lucid and were cool and made sense, and other times I was lost as to what was going on, or what was supposed to be going on.  I just kept reading or listening until I was back to a part that made sense.  The concepts I caught were very cool and a second read through would probably help.  Just because a solid half of the book escaped me doesn’t mean it wasn’t a good book.  I don’t have a sci fi brain. Some reviews I read on Amazon suggested there are sci fi brains out there that caught it more than mine did.  I’d think that something truly pulpy would have concepts easier to access than these.

Also, another female protagonist, brilliant, fearless and still loved by her crew and equals, which is nice that a woman written in the sixties is powerful without being unappealing to men, but I didn’t connect with her like I did to Binti.   Rydra uses relationships too to outsmart the enemy instead of brute force, but I liked Binti as a heroine much better.   Maybe I was just jealous that Rydra could probably bust out the sonnet I am puzzling over for my monthly poetry group.

I keep telling myself I’m going to slow down on the novels and read writing books, material being published in magazines I’d like to be in someday, or my numerous collections of short fiction.  Or listen to a few of the Great Courses I bought for the sake of helping move my writing along.  They are difficult to slow down on, even when I am ahead on my posts, which I currently am. I still downloaded a novel on audio for a new category instead of my one on how sci fi works, which is more relevant to some current projects.  I still want to read more of last year’s prizewinners.  And this year’s when they come.  And there’s a new Han Kang short that looks a bit experimental but also well done.

I can’t.

Comments/Likes/Shares!

 

 

Advertisements

2018 Prize Winners warning me not to quit my day job

It still resonates with me that when the Goodreads Choice Awards came up last year, I hadn’t read that came out that year to vote on.  It was an awesome reason why I hadn’t read anything that was in the running, but I missed reading the new stuff.  I usually try to hit the prizewinners of the year as well as some of the releases that look good.  I am going to try to read some 2019 releases, but before I did that, I caught up on two major prize winners for 2018.

I have been catching up too on other books that have been on the TBR too long, too, which will be discussed as the year goes on.

(Also, happy fourth Blog-A-Versary to me!  It’s kept me writing and thinking about my reading, which is awesome.)

Interesting about both of the prize winners I talk about have to do with the life of the writer, among other things. And the writerly talk is depressing, which makes me feel that I am brave as I am submitting and writing for immediate submission more than ever before in my adult life.  But I’m not sure how real my bravery is because I have a day job that, although it burns out my brain to the point where it can be hard to write on the side, I feel good about, fulfilled, and proud of, and how my writing career does or does not pan out will not detract from a sense of satisfaction as it already is.  So it frees me up a little emotionally, without all my eggs in one basket, so to speak.

the friend.jpg

The Friend, Sigrid Nunez

National Book Award Winner 2018

This haunting story is a warning:  don’t spend your life on writing if you can possibly make a life out of anything else.  Even the writer successes in this one come with crippling disappointment and anti-climactic teaching careers. There’s a lot of suicide.  The person that the main character is addressing through the novel is a victim of suicide.  A brilliant person who couldn’t be alone and was relegated to dealing with students, and then after his death gives the narrator a dog of his that is completely impractical for her to take care of, on top of heartbreaking.  Because I love having pets but they always break your heart when they die.  And this is a big dog that barely fits in her apartment and won’t live long  besides.  I spent part of the book praying this wouldn’t be a redo of The Art of Racing in the Rain where I just sobbed like an idiot for an hour at the end.

Despite the depressing story, it was still beautifully written and astute.  It wouldn’t be as depressing if it wasn’t as astute.  The artistry, to me, was that the narrator could wander into different parts of the story and it flowed beautifully from one aspect to the other:  the wives of the friend who gave her the dog, why they weren’t lovers and why his wives were jealous of this, how she gets the dog, how writing/teaching writing sucks, then more about how she gets to keep the dog, and then some on her therapy sessions to manage her grief and reflect on her not getting married or having a family herself, and what this means about her particular grief.  And then more about the relationship with the dog, and then more about her relationship to the dead person that she addresses throughout in second person.  Then some ex wife backstory. It was beautifully done.  Sometimes I was like, how did I get over here to this aspect of the story?  I could use more practice making things flow like that.

Also, this was another one that I mistakenly thought fit into a BookRiot category.  I thought the dog might narrate this business.  The weird cover with the dog suggests that.  The dog isn’t what makes the cover weird, it’s the blocks of color .  I’m like really, because a lot of people die in this at their own hand after years of emptiness. The dog is cool but the primary school colors gives the wrong vibe here.  Thank goodness this beautiful depression was short.

less.jpg

Less, Andrew Sean Greer

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, 2018

This one looked completely unappealing to me for like, ever.   I wasn’t sure I’d care about the protagonist and his issues.  It’s a little first world problem-y in an Eat Pray Love kind of way.  Like, yeah, a major relationship ending is hard, but it’s a little easier when you can shake it off traveling the world, and, oh yeah, maybe live some writer dreams.

Except that these are only dubious writer dreams. He wrote maybe one notable book of a few of them, and some people have read them, but not to the point he would be recognized on a plane or anything. He’s up for an award, but his publisher rejects his most recent attempt at a novel and he’s trying to fix it, despite some follies that get in the way, and the whole reason he’s even on this trip with it’s weird bouts of illness, faulty German, bizarre clothes and random lovers is to avoid an ex boyfriend’s wedding.   His honors are dubious and the author is very funny, and it had an appreciable twist at the end.  I didn’t know how it would end, and nearer the end I suspected I was getting a surprise, but I liked how it ended.  Compulsively readable, almost as much so as Where’d You Go, Bernadette.  Heavy warnings that if you can do anything other than write with your life, you probably should.

So, good for me I have done that. Getting traction with submitting writing has proven to be slow.  I become intimidated when researching a publication by what they have accepted, so sometimes it’s easier for me to just look at a call for submissions, see if I can think up anything fast enough, and go.  All these, MFA, previously published in, I don’t know, Harpers, Tin House, The New Yorker, places I don’t know if I would ever have the stones to send anything to.  My first rejection of the year was very kindly done, even if it was a form email.  It told me to keep up the hope. These stories tell me to focus my energies elsewhere.

I’m trying to do a better job looking at new releases this year.

I hope Spring is starting to take decent hold, wherever you are.  D vitamins have helped, but every winter gets long.

Comments/likes/shares!