BookRiot: A Comic by an LGBTQIA creator

Harvesting the garden bounty is a little consolation for the mornings not being as bright and the sky tucking away into darkness more closely to my bedtime.  But the world still tilts and we are keeping track of the summer weekends we have left to make the most of them.  I realized I only have a week left of summer camp lunches to put together because I am doing my second week of Ward Off Mom Guilt vacation with my son this summer and we are going to visit my sister, which he has been BEGGING to do for, like, 8 months.  I hope the trip is everything that he has been hoping that it will be.  If it isn’t I’m going to blame Strong Museum of Play for running ads all the way out here and reminding him that we haven’t done that in way too long.

So, more graphics this week, as I binged the graphics with better library access during my other week of warding off the mom guilt for putting my kid in camp for most of the summer.  I didn’t try to get fancy with this one and wander outside BookRiot’s recommendations.  As I said at the end of my previous post, I didn’t want to be poking into my author’s proclivities in order to see if they fit the category or not.

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Through the Woods, Emily Carroll

A collection of five dark, nightmarish shorts that have the ability to keep you up at night, all with illustrations on every page.  It was haunting and diverting and I was carried away from my library chair tucked in the stacks reading it for a rainy afternoon.

It has been a month now about since I read it two stories particularly stand out. Two that were longer where she had more of a chance to develop the plot line.  I’m all about flashes and super shorts, they are absolutely their own art form, but the ones I liked best of hers were the longer ones, and some of the reviews I see agreed.  It must have been an amazing amount of work to illustrate five scary stories like that, pictures spread across 200 plus pages.  Three might have been better?  I loved it though.  It would have scared the crap out of me as a teenager.  If I had a a teen to give it to I would due to the excellent macabre feelings it invokes.  A teenager who would read it multiple times as their creepy diversion reading at the end of a long day of reading what everyone else wants them to read.

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Goldie Vance, Vol 1, Hope Larsen

An amateur sleuth gets into tangles at the luxury resort she is working at and finds a promising love match along the way in this first volume of comics.

I read this during a morning in bed.  Those reading mornings don’t happen much in the bustle of summer, they are more a winter thing for me, and usually at the end of the year when it’s a BookRiot demand for something graphic and its a last minute cram in.  This was fun, I can see where graphics have their pull.  Lots of plot lines spun out and Goldie has an assertive, impulsive, get yourself into trouble kind of personality that should make her a fun character to read over a series.  She’s likeable and she does stupid things and has an enemy out of the girls whose father employs her, so perfect right?  Not all the characters are white, Goldie’s parents aren’t together and the love interest is same sex, which is nicely becoming more of a thing.  So a kid who might not be a strong reader who picks this up may have more in common with her than in other comic characters.

I will begrudgingly admit that the graphic requirement for these challenges is becoming significantly less onerous as I get into it more.  Not that I will become a graphic reader for myself.  I don’t see that.

I have one more BookRiot post next week to finish out (!) my August of challenge posts.  The fall I will be a little diverted because my diversion reads piled on and I have been able to categorize them into posts with some seasonal themes to them.  I can think of at least three more posts I have in my head to get out in the fall months, buy me time to do the last three categories of BookRiot as well as obligatory seasonal reads as the year ends in the blink of an eye.  Because you all know it will.

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BookRiot: #ownvoices in Oceania

I can’t believe it’s already August.  I feel like I blinked at my child’s Field Day in the middle of June and I arrived here.  It’s been wonderful, of course, just seems like all the weeks of plans I made will be over way too soon.  Another summer I’m trying to make awesome for my kid gone.

It’s back to BookRiot reads, and although I feel I’m moving along at a good clip, I also get worried about fitting them all in with the seasonal reads to complete my year of probably more reading than I needed to do.

.  And cheating with diversion reads.  Cheating!  That’s really the problem.

And my own whiteness forcing me to look up the definitions of Oceania.

An Ownvoices Book Set in Oceania:

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Flying Fox in a Freedom Tree, Albert Wendt

This is a collection of shorts written about the realities of traditional island life.  He wrote longer, more epic type stories as well, but I thought a collection of shorts might give me a wider taste of the region than a story focused on one family.

The writing was simple and without flourish, even though the style does change in some stories based on who is narrating.  The stories take place in a land of patriarchy and poverty, where men and their silly whims seem to rule where women only exist in their relationship to men.  Women need to be virgins and then stay home to bear children.  Women are nags and crazy if they get in the way of what men want to do.  They talk about boys becoming men by standing up, girls become women just by having sex.

The story I read most compulsively, and because I only could get it in paper form on the football field during practice, was Pint Sized Devil on a Thoroughbred, which is about a small man who is orphaned and grows up to be a classic con artist. He uses people and indulges in every imaginable and available sin and is still a hero in the eyes of his enabling family that he uses terribly through his short time on Earth.  I don’t know why it was compelling, but maybe it was because it was a character study that brought out my understanding of the culture at large.  Also The Cross of Soot stood out to me, too, a story of a boy interacting with adult male prisoners and it being a coming of age of sorts.  But mostly they were flat characters chasing after their ids.

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The Whale Rider, Whiti Ihimaera

This is a story about how a culture will go on in a changing world:  there is no male heir, but a female heir, to the Maori tribe, which is unheard of.  She has to prove herself in a way no male ever has in order to save her tribe, using her gift of communing with whales.

This was only a three hour listen, done easily in my commute to Albany on my week off to take my child to robotics camp, but it had so much more depth and color than Flying Fox in a Freedom Tree.  It had the same feeling of rigid patriarchy, but there was so much more to the women.  This is about not only a woman as a sign of changing times, but also about the environment signaling changes.  Both books were about cultures in Oceania making their way into the modern world, but I felt so much more actually changed in this book, in a good way, in these stories.  I, and anyone else reading this would, root for the little girl who is pining for the love of her great grandfather and destined to rule.  BookRiot recommended this one so I know it counted, and it was a great story.  Easier to get through and digest.  Softer on the feels and sensibilities than Flying Fox.

It’s also a movie I haven’t seen.  I’ve seen barely any adult movies since like grad school.

As usual, I’m grateful to BookRiot for pressing my horizons.  Even though Flying Fox was a press at times to get through.  And I almost counted it in shorts, but then I got caught up in the shorts I was already doing, and there wasn’t room for that sort of cheating.

August will be completely BookRiot, so stay tuned for how I get through the challenges.

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The Final Summer of Shorts

It’s the final week of shorts and already the last week of July.

It’s been an awesome July, watching my son play football unexpectedly well (my kid is good at sports but last year he wasn’t ready to run the ball until the last game), soaking up the greenery of the world at this time of year, and the week I took off to take my son to robotics camp where I got a ton of reading done and pushed myself to get back into some sort of writing.  It has been a challenge with all the changes at work and the busy of summer to focus on creative things, but the week off with some time to myself seemed to help.

As far as shorts are concerned, this of course was a rabbit hole.  So many collections to read and explore and admire. I could have done two months plus of shorts with what I had in my collection still, but I wanted to be sure I got through the BookRiot books for this year, too.   I spent my reading time doing both during my rides back and forth to Albany and my pillaging a library out there while he was at camp.

There was a Starbucks trip but the books were better at the library.

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Trigger Warning:  Short Fictions and Disturbances,  Neil Gaiman

A collection of short works by Neil, a few were poetry,  a few were like fairy tales, a few were the typical short stories/science fiction/fantasy some with characters borrowed from other places. I thankfully listened to the forward in which he talks about how this collection hangs rather loosely together and where they are from.  The title of Trigger Warning is to suggest that these pieces are united by hopefully getting the reader to feel about the works presented.   He talks about trigger warnings on things on the internet now and his wanting people to read about things that will make them think and feel, stir them up a bit, learn from them, even if the experience is intense.  I have seen others have conflicting views on trigger warnings, believing them to not be valuable things.  I probably am mixed, there is enough trauma in this world to give people the warning that they can avoid encountering something that makes them feel triggered or unsafe.  It can be a way of rebuilding a sense of safety.

You’d think the writings would be a little more provocative with that kind of title, and the stories are good, and thought provoking, and like the blurb promises, “talks about who we are behind the mask”, but they aren’t over the top or super edgy.  This is only my third work I have read by Gaiman but it seems to be in keeping with his other works, thought provoking, interesting, but not too edgy.  Things wouldn’t have made as much sense without the forward, however, I am in a bit of a slump about being confident in my writing and he talks about all the commissions and accolades the collected works have gotten.  Not that I ever thought I would be Neil Gaiman, but it was a pretty strong reminder that I was not put on this earth to be Neil.

I liked his fairy tale like stories the best, like the layers he added to the Sleeper and the Spindle, and the stories where there are murderous plots afoot.  I keep thinking about the story were a dwarf is led to a cave of treasures and what he finds there. It was difficult having him narrate the entire book in terms of keeping track of the beginning and ends of stories.  In Memory Wall there were different narrators for different stories and the end of one story was announced and the beginning of another, which was helpful.  It got confusing especially in Calendar of Tales, which would have been even more confusing without the forward, due to them being shorts.  Not that Gaiman cannot do a lovely job of narrating stories in his British accent and emphasis in all the places that he intended.  He absolutely can do that.  And he didn’t have the weird ending to stories like Oyeyemi where I felt left in the lurch, like I was still missing something.  Neil Gaiman is an artist and I need to read American Gods and his other stuff. T.B.R.

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Tenth of December, George Saunders

A collection of true to life stories that are hilarious but still manage to say important things, grab and move a reader.

I loved Lincoln in the Bardo, but I felt that that book would not have been accessible in the book format, more over audio, so that is a part of the reason I got this lovey on audio.  It’s definitely not like Lincoln in the Bardo, but that doesn’t make it any less brilliant.  I have seen in advertised all over my bookish life but I had no idea how laugh out loud funny this would be along with it’s poignancy.  I was driving my kid to robotics camp an hour away and laughing out loud.  I have seen in the reviews that it’s hilarious, but I don’t always see the hilarity that other readers see, but this time I did.  Wow.  It was all at once sad, poignant, funny, and moving.  He captured the streams of consciousness that can be heartbreaking as well as just who we are as humans in our every day lives.

Probably my favorite story is the one where the young man who has helicopter parents and a healthy case of tourettes has to make a decision about doing the right thing in a scary situation.  The way the child thinks is funny but the conflict he comes across in the narrative is also very real.  I think it’s a common conflict of teens after years of being told what to do, when all of a sudden they are placed in situations where they need to start acting on their own and what that transition is about, especially when they are in a world that does not allow them autonomy. And that was just the opener, the rest of the stories tumbling  out in their surprising hilarity after.

It wasn’t, as one Amazon reviewer put it, typical New Yorker fiction about white rich people and angst. All of these were very real.  And I can’t say enough about how funny they were too.  I was surprised by the humor that he could put into genuine, real situations.

I am tagging this post also as audio masterpieces because the author narration significantly added to the experience of both of these books.

Two excellent collections of shorts to take in, to finish off the eight I did for this blog series.

Back to BookRiot for August!  The year is already growing short!

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Summer of Shorts 2: The Bloody Chamber and What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours

Week Two in my summer of shorts.  Have I mentioned my deep and abiding love of summer?

I spent this week off, taking my son to a local camp programming robots to ease up the Mom guilt of working year round and my son asking me why I do that, and my honest response of not being able to be home all day every day and be happy.  My middle ground is taking more time off in the summer to be with him and do things with him.  I’m trying to paste together an excellent childhood for him, which would be impossible if I didn’t go to work most of the 18 years that he is with me.

I work with kids and I know that most of the memories they reference when asked what their favorite memories are are the small things.  A time when a parent showed up to something.  Day trips, sports games.  But I still want to do the most I can with the time I have.   Maybe this has amplified with the crazy developmental strides I have seen in my son this year.  Right now he’s cutting his own nails without my asking or prompting him.

But the shorts I am talking about today don’t have much to do with my pervasive mom guilt.  I enjoyed them more than the two books I reviewed in last week’s post, and they had both been long time TBR hangers, which is partly the purpose of dedicating a month of summer reading to short forms.

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The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories, Angela Carter

This is a series of re-imagined fairy tales with a decidedly Gothic and romantic/sexual spin on them.  Carter also adds a significant dash of horror in there. I can see how fairy tales are a blank slate of sorts, a skeleton plot on which to project any theme desired, spin it in any sort of way.

I like fairytale retellings, and I love a Gothic feminist spin. The tone was set by the first story, Bluebeard, which unspooled a terrible and beautiful, enchanting Gothic tale. I only listened to this on audio and it would have been helpful to have it in print form, because sometimes I didn’t know if a story had changed into a different story or the same one from another perspective/narrator.  It would have been good to check where one ended and another began in a few instances.  Sometimes the beasts felt like they overlapped.

The narration was haunting, the retelling and the new spins enchanting.  Themes of inequality between the sexes and the precarious way women had to live in those times were pervasive in the narratives.  Lots of blood in many forms:  death, first menses, virginity/sexuality.   Transporting and for how long it’s been waiting for me to devour it, it was worth the long range eyeball.

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What is Not Yours Is Not Yours, Helen Oyeyemi

A collection of tales, some that felt with a tinge of supernatural/magical realism to me (never a bad thing with me unless involving weird sexuality) all having a key involved.  The key isn’t to the same thing every time, and the key is often the entrance to another layer of story rather than the end/resolution to the story.  Keys are mentioned in the blurb but I actually had not read the blurb and I went back to it after about halfway through, maybe not even that far, noticing yet another key while listening to the narration of stories.

I feel vindicated in that other Goodreads reviewers mentioned that these tales are weird, disorienting, and would need a second pass over to collect all the bits.  It is truly a writer whose stories do that much to a reader, turn us upside down and wonder if we had missed something.  They would end abruptly too, and I would go back to my kindle version to be sure the story actually ended and another one had started.  Of course the narrators were different but often I was like wait did that one from before truly resolve enough to be considered done?   Other readers commented that the ends of the stories lacked an umph or a satisfaction for them, too, wondering if they had missed something.

Probably the story that resonated the most with me was Presence.  I don’t know if it is because the main characters are psychologists and one works with children and I could relate more in this aspect. Initially I bristled at the main character being a Psychologist but also on her third marriage and in her own treatment.  It’s not that we don’t need treatment, it just initially made me wonder why she was a little dysfunctional and in a healing profession, until Oyeyemi goes into her past as an adopted child, as well as her husband being an adopted childhood friend, and all the issues that come with that.  But then they test out a method he is using to help grieving people that ends up being haunting, weird, and capitalizing on connections that she had been missing from her life. Like I said, all the stories are a little disorienting and this one was not different, but it was also heartbreaking.

I have seen calls for submissions that want work reminiscent of Oyeyemi, and I don’t know if I have it in me as a writer to extend myself so loosely into the world like she can do. White Is For Witching was lovely but loose as well.  I do my monthly short story with the writing group I love but I haven’t been able to creep out to such dimensions.  I think I need to read more Neil Gaiman and Kelly Link, both of whose works I have sitting on my Kindle.

Summer of shorts continues into next week.  I think I could be taking more risks with my own writing of shorts.  It probably means I need to be writing more.  Isn’t that always the solution?  The hidden answer to everything?

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BookRiot: Award winning authors

My son can’t decide if he thinks my laptop wallpaper is cute or stressful.

Its a kitten either trying not to fall off something or trying to climb on something.  I like the picture because I liked that the cat had gotten itself into something or was about to get itself into something.  I can be like that.  I can’t always be happy just chillin, I have to be making my own entertainment.

Two on a theme again this week:

A book by a female or author of color that won a literary award in 2018

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Hello, Universe, Erin Entrada Kelly

2018 winner of the Newbery Medal for outstanding contribution to children’s literature

Good middle grade novels, especially involving middle schoolers like this one does, always involve a whole heap of uncomfortable awkwardness poured into a relatively unique situation, which is exactly what this book is.  It’s about kids who don’t fit into molds coming together through an almost emergency situation and friendships in common.  And, even better, which is what the market is looking for right now, one of the perspective characters is a deaf girl.  More engendering empathy.    Another child, Virgil, is Latin American, and he isn’t as effusive as the rest of his family.  Another one who talks about how he doesn’t fit in.  And, slight spoiler alert, he has a crush on the deaf girl, which is also excellent. It’s a great kids book and was a quick read for me.  I hope it doesn’t count as like a cheat read because I have some Coretta Scott King award winners on tap for this year.  Although that category specifies children’s or middle grade.  This category doesn’t.  Newbery Medal winners are always worth reading, though, and this could possibly go on the list of what I might share with my son.

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How Long til Black Future Month, NK Jemisin

Winner of the 2018 Hugo Award for The Stone Sky

Now, possibly Hello Universe could have been a cheat read if I also hadn’t tackled this one.  I have been wanting to read NK Jemisin but I haven’t wanted to commit myself to her science fiction novels.  Even though they have been recommended to me as sci fi/fantasy that isn’t based on white European medieval social structure or heteronormative narratives.  I wanted to taste her work and I am working on my own short stories, so it’s always a good idea to read what the masters are putting out.

I actually read the introduction, which gave me hope as a writer for two reasons:  one, she didn’t come into her writing prime until she was older than I am now, which is good because I am just starting out and I get into this idea that other people got into their glory faster than I would ever hope to.  If there’s even a glory for me to be had in this.  I can’t assume that.  And second, that she used the word sharted, and it wasn’t edited out and it was allowed to stay there as a sign to me that this book was worth reading.  On top of, you know, all her accolades from people who are allowed to give meaningful ones.  She was talking about sharting out science fiction that was more the stuff that white guys churn out to get noticed in a market that wasn’t ready for diverse voices.  In case your shart curiosity was piqued, which mine would have been.

Some of these I really loved, like Red Dirt Witch (one that many others on the reviews enjoyed) Valedictorian, Cuisine des Memoirs, L’Alchimista, and Sinners, Saints, Dragons and Haints, in the City Beneath Still Waters.  Some of them got away from me, like science fiction can for me, and I get a little lost.  Maybe because the stuff that is more out there to me isn’t as interesting so my brain stops participating.   It happened with the PKD book.  I wondered if other reviewers had a similar experience and they really didn’t seem to.  The stories that I enjoyed I noticed had more of a human element to them.   They were good, though, fantastical, creative, sharp in its portrayal of race and class.    I think Red Dirt Witch is popular because its about black people seeing the future of the human rights movement and becoming hopeful that the world can change for them.  And not just, you know, a black  person in the white house, but the realities of the riots and protests.

I had this on audio to work through it, but it had more to do with the genre than her writing.  When she really has the page space to spin out her world building I might have to pay harder attention because I imagine it is extensive and cool.

Clearly both of these women are award winning authors in their premises and stories.

I really read too much for the next two posts, so stay tuned.  Still binge reading.

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Review: The Hollow Traveller by J.L.Oakman

This week is a short break from the riotous September and the scary reads October.

I am a member of Your Write Dream on Facebook, a group run by Kristen Kieffer of well-storied.com. Sometimes I post on Kristen’s Shameless Self-Promo thread. Quite a brilliant move, I’d say, for her to offer it.  And in return if you have thought about joining an online writing community, this is a great place to ask and have questions answered and get support with writing.

Through my shameless self promo I was solicited for an honest review in exchange for a copy of a book:

 

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The Hollow Traveler, J.L. Oakman

I remember learning about the solar system in elementary school and the briefly breath arresting reality that the sun, as with all stars, will inevitably die, and then so will all the life that depends on the life of the star.  I say only briefly arresting because then I’m told that it’s estimated that the sun will die long after I am long obsolete myself.  As long as I don’t think too long about the fact that I will be so long dead as to be totally inconsequential, instead of just mostly, I’m okay.

But then this book brings out that uncomfortable reality of the universe slowly winking out on itself, the narrator chronicling the last bit of time, the last vestiges of civilization.  It is a little reminiscent of the Jules Verne that I have read, written when the planet was still a new place and not nearly as connected as it is today.  Verne is a little more fantastical whereas the stories of the snuffed out civilizations in The Hollow Traveller are post apocalyptic and completely feasible. They are the stories, that have been true for past civilizations on this planet. They are snippets, dipping a toe into each short segment of a civilization’s ended story as discovered by the traveler.

This was a short read that unfolds surprises about the narrator and the nature of the world he is in in the stories of the places he has visited.  It is a diverting read, perfect if you are into science fiction and need something short.  I am assuming that if you are into science fiction you can handle being reminded of the ending of the too endless to conceptualize universe.  That’s the most anxiety producing part.

I recommend this book and I am grateful for the opportunity to review it.

October begins tomorrow and the scary reads are lined up for the season!

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Dear Teenage Self: Yup, you were right.

So I was hard on my 15-17 year old angsty self for a number of years for not having the courage to pursue a career in writing.  Not having the balls.

I was less hard in more recent years because the more I learn and think about themes and character arcs and plots, the more I realize that it was difficult for me to know what to write about as a kid with my extremely limited scope of experience.  Remember, kids, there was not really an interwebs until I was 14-15 and I used it to talk to randos in chat rooms and send emails to people whom I saw in school during the day.  There were none of the fun teen writing communities and resources and even chances to practice by writing fan fiction that there are now. And my childhood was uneventful.  I guess I could say sheltered but I had had plenty of time to run off and get into unsupervised trouble on my own.  I was still an 80’s kid, after all.

When I decided it was time to get serious about writing one of the best things I did was go through and like writing related Facebook pages and subscribe with some discretion to writing blogs.  Liking pages for literary journals and writers digest and getting into 12 short stories (I don’t even remember how I found that one but I’m so happy I did) and to have a Pinterest board for prompts and writing articles.

All of that was easier than what I am facing now. (Worry not/spoiler alert I do actually talk about a specific book in this post).

I have the chance to make all my dreaming and hoping of becoming a novelist real.  I have the tutelage and one on one help of a writing instructor whose course I won.  I have an idea that started off decent and she has already made it more exciting and cool than I had thought on my own and has springboarded me into another level already.

And I haven’t written a scene.

I am working through the accompanying workbook, I am almost done and out of excuses.  I have drafted out some scenes during pivotal plot points in order to find my way a little, but writing out something I am intending on having her look over to keep in my pile for further working?  Nope.  Got some sweet backstories, listed character traits, printed out pictures of everything I think is relevant.  My excited father is like, send me scenes!  Nope.

Just like when I felt like I had to come out with some good fiction as a kid, I am jamming up.  I am so excited I finished another book for BookRiot to have something different to write  today.  It’s still writing, right? I also may have finished a scene for a short I am dragging myself through.

I am not used to feeling this way.  In academia, I was reading the material and gathering sources for end of semester projects from the first week, ready to jump right in.  Excited about what I was going to learn and how I was going to put it all together.

And here I am, having written a few decent things, like I did as a teen, and then hitting a wall when I decide to chase that rabbit down the hole.

There is something different this time, though.  I know there is a way around the wall. I will probably sit and force myself to write terribly and tunnel my way through it.  I have too much legwork already done to gum up before I put down anything to submit to my instructor.  I am not a kid anymore.

But to my kid self: man, you were right, this sucks.  And I am still glad that you didn’t want to rely your life on reading and writing.  I am glad you decided to go in other directions, too.

Also, it is unrealistic to me to never read.  Downtime has been eaten up by activities that lead to my self loathing, like scrolling way too much social media and watching shows that I get nothing out of other than entertainment while knitting (which is something, I can’t say it’s nothing at all).  But I have been looking through the Read Harder challenge and finding shorter reads that fit the bill right now:

A Work of Genre Fiction in Translation:

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Black Tea and Other Tales, Samuel Marolla

I feel this also gets extra points because it is self published, although as I have said before on this blog, I have read a good number of self published works that were as good as things being produced by publishers (two of whom I am thinking about right now, Ania Ahlborn and Intisar Khanani were both picked up by big fivers and they totally deserve it).

I actually liked the title story, Black Tea, the least.  It was more confusing, more in your face horror with a grotesque monster than the other two.  I don’t know if that is because it is maybe the most classic idea of horror that it got the top bill on this collection? I saw another reviewer on Amazon feeling similarly about Black Tea, but the following two stories, of a man with nothing to lose given a wish granting wine and an eleven year old boy cursed with a visiting nighttime spectre were intriguing and different.  They were transporting and scary and I liked the settings.  I wonder if people who don’t get through Black Tea also don’t make it to the other two stories, which would be a shame.

I always expect to like reading the different things that Read Harder makes me look into, and this did not disappoint. There were longer and more expensive books that I might have read, like Hex, which has been on my wishlist forever, but I liked something shorter right now.  I am sure Hex will be diverting once I get into it.

So I am learning about how I will live my life around noveling.  I think I should note that it is also a challenge right now because I have written a manuscript but on my own time frame.  I want the bulk of this written/worked out by the summer, as I have to use my Skypes by six months from starting them. That is why I am turning down all my other hobbies.  I have not committed to training for something long or a cabled sweater or an 8oo page novel or crafting down my craft backlog.  Those things will wait.  For now.

And I’ll figure it out.  I don’t know what I am reading next but let’s be honest, I’ll have something chosen by the end of the day.

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