BookRiot: A Comic by an LGBTQIA creator

Harvesting the garden bounty is a little consolation for the mornings not being as bright and the sky tucking away into darkness more closely to my bedtime.  But the world still tilts and we are keeping track of the summer weekends we have left to make the most of them.  I realized I only have a week left of summer camp lunches to put together because I am doing my second week of Ward Off Mom Guilt vacation with my son this summer and we are going to visit my sister, which he has been BEGGING to do for, like, 8 months.  I hope the trip is everything that he has been hoping that it will be.  If it isn’t I’m going to blame Strong Museum of Play for running ads all the way out here and reminding him that we haven’t done that in way too long.

So, more graphics this week, as I binged the graphics with better library access during my other week of warding off the mom guilt for putting my kid in camp for most of the summer.  I didn’t try to get fancy with this one and wander outside BookRiot’s recommendations.  As I said at the end of my previous post, I didn’t want to be poking into my author’s proclivities in order to see if they fit the category or not.

through the woods.jpg

Through the Woods, Emily Carroll

A collection of five dark, nightmarish shorts that have the ability to keep you up at night, all with illustrations on every page.  It was haunting and diverting and I was carried away from my library chair tucked in the stacks reading it for a rainy afternoon.

It has been a month now about since I read it two stories particularly stand out. Two that were longer where she had more of a chance to develop the plot line.  I’m all about flashes and super shorts, they are absolutely their own art form, but the ones I liked best of hers were the longer ones, and some of the reviews I see agreed.  It must have been an amazing amount of work to illustrate five scary stories like that, pictures spread across 200 plus pages.  Three might have been better?  I loved it though.  It would have scared the crap out of me as a teenager.  If I had a a teen to give it to I would due to the excellent macabre feelings it invokes.  A teenager who would read it multiple times as their creepy diversion reading at the end of a long day of reading what everyone else wants them to read.

goldie vance.jpg

Goldie Vance, Vol 1, Hope Larsen

An amateur sleuth gets into tangles at the luxury resort she is working at and finds a promising love match along the way in this first volume of comics.

I read this during a morning in bed.  Those reading mornings don’t happen much in the bustle of summer, they are more a winter thing for me, and usually at the end of the year when it’s a BookRiot demand for something graphic and its a last minute cram in.  This was fun, I can see where graphics have their pull.  Lots of plot lines spun out and Goldie has an assertive, impulsive, get yourself into trouble kind of personality that should make her a fun character to read over a series.  She’s likeable and she does stupid things and has an enemy out of the girls whose father employs her, so perfect right?  Not all the characters are white, Goldie’s parents aren’t together and the love interest is same sex, which is nicely becoming more of a thing.  So a kid who might not be a strong reader who picks this up may have more in common with her than in other comic characters.

I will begrudgingly admit that the graphic requirement for these challenges is becoming significantly less onerous as I get into it more.  Not that I will become a graphic reader for myself.  I don’t see that.

I have one more BookRiot post next week to finish out (!) my August of challenge posts.  The fall I will be a little diverted because my diversion reads piled on and I have been able to categorize them into posts with some seasonal themes to them.  I can think of at least three more posts I have in my head to get out in the fall months, buy me time to do the last three categories of BookRiot as well as obligatory seasonal reads as the year ends in the blink of an eye.  Because you all know it will.

Comments/Likes/Shares!

 

Advertisements

BookRiot: Manga

That picture is not me.

Memes are coming out on social media that once August comes, the New Year is rapidly following on its heels.   I hate being able to agree now with that feeling, with my son’s birthday and Halloween lumped together, but the wheels of time spin faster with every year.  Now that I’m about to have a second grader, I’m wondering where that summer went two years ago when I was anticipating my son’s transition into kindergarten and public school.

It’s only the second Sunday in August and I have some fall season reads done and noted in a file for when I'[m ready to post on them.  I cheat on my challenge books with scary reads sometimes with the justification that I can post on them later.

I used to love fall but I seem to get sad now when pumpkin spice comes out.

In anticipation of how fast the year wraps up and the other reads I do for that, August has to be packed with BookRiot.  And this time I did not hold off on the least favorite reads until after the Christmas reads were finished:  manga and comics.

It didn’t hurt that the library I crashed at for a week had a great selection of both that made this super easy.

black jack.jpg

Black Jack Vol 2, Osamu Tezuka

This series features a genius doctor performing medical feats and miracles while having rejected holding a medical license in Japan.

I did this book in two hours on a library patio while occasionally reading in the wrong direction on a beautiful sunny day, so reading my least favorite category wasn’t terrible.  And it wasn’t a celebrity memoir, so there is that.  I tried to learn about Japanese culture and what might be so appealing about this series, as it looks very popular in Japan, as I read this.  This doctor is selfish and charges through the nose for what he does, feeling against the collective nature of Japanese society as I understand it.  Maybe that is a bit of wish fulfillment for people raised to consider others before themselves and go with the flow?  I don’t want to speak too far from my experience here, but I’m wondering if his being contrary to the general values makes him appealing.  The stories show that he has a huge and caring heart but he always dips back into his darker nature:  extortion and selfishness and being a loner.   And I mistakenly didn’t read the first one so I don’t know what the story is with that child/wife thing he has living at home that he takes care of?   That part got creepy because she is clearly emotionally a child but then acts like a jealous wife, a weird adult/child mixup that isn’t appealing.

I was interested enough in the stories, and it was a series of stories rather than one big plot line, good twists to keep you going, and you always know he’s going to beat the system and wonder how he will do it while also usually exposing ingrained societal flaws.  Entertainment and I tried to understand that culture while I was reading their popular material.

hamlet manga.jpg

Manga Shakespeare: Hamlet by Richard Appignanesi and Emma Vieceli

This is a straight up adaptation of Hamlet.  No changed names or details or having it in another setting or time.

So this helped the play be more accessible, but it was not the window into another culture that I was hoping it was going to be.  It just was…Hamlet.  I hadn’t done the play before, and now I better understand the references…made in my own culture.  Ha.  It wasn’t even in the Japanese direction for reading books.  So I guess in a basic way it captures the letter of the category, but not the spirit of such.  I’m glad there is a more accessible version, although I don’t think Shakespeare was ever intended to be in the white literary canon for the ages.  I don’t think that he ever intended for a woman over 400 years later to have read at least five of them that I can think of as I’m writing this.  But here we are.   I just was hoping something had been done differently with it, but also it said Manga on it, and BookRiot hadn’t recommended it specifically (like they had Black Jack) so I wanted to be sure that it fit.  And it’s my second manga for the category.   It happened, now I’ve posted, and there will be other posts this month about finishing my double dip reading challenge to follow up as I dread the cold weather coming.

Next week I’ll tackle the comic by an LGBT writer.  And I totally used what they recommended, because I hate poking around in Author bios to see if they are gay.  Feels voyeuristic.  I’ll try to enjoy these beautiful warm and green weeks.

Comments/likes/shares are always welcome!

 

 

 

 

 

 

BookRiot: Books by Journalists

It’s been Spring to me for two weeks now.  Finally.  It can be a little cold, no more fresh snow that lasts for more than a few hours, and my summer dresses are coming out of the bin and getting hangers again in the closet.  And my son had his first soccer practice last week, the surest sign that the warm season in here.

The momming changes with the seasons.  In so many ways.

I haven’t been focusing on longer books like I have other years because any reader of mine knows that I am trying to put in the time writing, but when I took my obligatory Spring staycation, I felt that I wanted to knock out a bigger book that I have been meaning to read as part of my BookRiot journey.  (We also know that I accidentally read a good part of In Cold Blood before I realized that Truman Capote was not in fact a journalist.  Even though the book was very journalistic.)

I found that I missed being consumed in a longer book, even though I can’t do it on a regular basis at this point. And even though I was consumed by it I was still able to write and send out some writing.  Ahh, staycation.

Glorious as it was, I missed my day job.  And I’m such a lucky person to love so many things about my life.  The luckiest I know probably.  How could I not be with the she shed post?  As I am writing this I am drinking wine in it for the first time.

But onto the books:

A Book Written by a Journalist or About Journalism:

The girl with the dragon tattoo.jpg

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Stieg Larsson

I don’t know how much I need to recap the plot here, really, (being what, eleven years late to the game?) but a disgraced financial journalist, Mikhail Blomquist, accepts an offer to solve a fifty year old mystery of a disappearance of a young woman who was very loved by her uncle who is close to death and wants to know what happened to her.  As with any nearly 500 page tome, this book accumulates layers quickly, increasing complications for all involved.  Call in a hacker, Lisbeth Salander, with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder, make her kick some ass against the system and mix her in with the charismatic ladies man protagonist, and they are a formidable force, solving the mystery and restoring Mikhail to his former standing in his magazine, redeemed in all ways.

I admit when The New Yorker didn’t like this I was a little scared off it. If I remember correctly the writer didn’t think Salander was likeable.  I very much rooted for her, which would make sense based on my work as a Psychologist with children.  Lisbeth, with her strengths obvious to anyone willing to take a few moments with her, was someone whose corner I rushed into.  And her story pulled me in much faster than the fifty or so opening pages discussing the financial world and setting up the libel suit that Blomquist loses to set him up for his tasks in the remainder of the novel.

Winter was on its last leg on the week of my staycation but it was still standing on it, and having a story so intensely wintry helped me appreciate the weather I was having.  I loved the atmosphere of Sweden, the family compound, the family drama. I found it transporting, even when I had to keep it together to keep characters straight.  I could get through the slower political parts because I liked the town, and I liked watching Blomquist cast his spell over multiple women, including (spoiler alert) the traumatized and standoffish Salander.  I liked seeing his magic on the ladies.  I love seeing people do what they do best, and these characters were strong and clear enough to allow for that.

And I didn’t expect the outcome of the disappearance plotline.  I liked the pleasant surprise of this.  I liked how the plots interwove to keep me guessing and worried that Blomquist was painted into a corner or there was some other nefarious aspect that was not accounted for. Can you tell I don’t even get around to movies most of the time?  Unless they are kids movies.  I love to snuggle with my kid while watching one of those.

There are a few other reasons I didn’t get to this right away: I knew it started slowly, in the novel gossip that floats ones way when a big book has been out for eleven years and you just have not gotten to it.  And when it becomes a movie and you still have not prioritized it on the TBR.  Ha.  Also I was just coming out of school and focusing on either classics or the more addictive modern novels to get myself back into hobbies when this book hit shelves.

I got this out of the library as a book and also borrowed the audio, and I loved reading a crinkly covered library hardback. I loved making progress on audio and flipping pages and holding a book open with my son during his reading time.  I am a big ebook girl, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t get started on reading with the pleasures of a physical book with a presence.

I guess I assumed that since this was a trilogy the plots would be interlaced, but this seemed like a standalone, and I was interested enough to google what the caper would be in the next novel.  Which is a ringing endorsement coming from me.

It was a delicious experience to involve myself in a longer book.

and when she was good.jpg

And When She Was Good, Laura Lippman

I feel as though more fiction and nonfiction is more available in my library than other genres.  If this is true and not a personal bias, I wonder if these titles just tend to get checked out more than literary fiction.  There were plenty of Laura Lippman books available on the shelves and electronically.

This particular Lippman tale is about a suburban madam, and the narrative weaves between how she got to be one in the first place, and then moving forward out of this complex corner into which she has painted herself.   I spent the time interested in how she got there and then how she was going to get out. At first I thought there was too much time spent in the narrative on the fact that she was a madam, but then I realized that that was the story.  And it was so well done, the details on how this was feasible in the modern world of taxes and accountability with business.

I would absolutely read another Lippman novel with her well researched ideas and this one had an intriguing crime plot.  Like, when the protagonist finally gets herself free it adds on another threat to her life that she has to resolve.  Such good stuff.

It makes sense that journalism can be complementary to fiction because the research needed for plots is already done in the journalism work.  It’s like psychology where every day I study and watch how people change and how they get better when they get what they need, rather than what they think that they want.  I have had to work on developing my motivations in my own writing, which isn’t as much of a stretch sometimes because of what I do.  Sometimes.  Other times I feel like I have to push to make my motivations come together.  Like I have been toying with the idea of at least outlining a mystery novel and I can’t come up with a motive for murder that I can hide behind other red herrings.  Not that I need another outlined novel.  Ha.

Novel edits are moving.  More will be written to send out to other presses to work on gathering some publishing cred.  And the dreaded months won’t be back for awhile.

Life is good.

Likes/Comments/Shares!

The Last Reading Binge of 2018

Reading is many things: mind expansion, travel, exposure to different viewpoints, inspiration, etc, but sometimes for me it is survival.  Sometimes placing one foot in a fantasy world helps me manage less structured times and the boredom I have been known to suffer in those times.  I like a break but then I’m over it quickly.  I get shifty. I keep my brain alive by darting in and out of a fantasy world of someone else’s making.

Not all books are carved out for fantasy darting.  I didn’t dart in and out of, like, War and Peace or another round of Don Quixote.  No.

Her Royal Spyness series by Rhys Bowen:

Queen of Hearts, Malice at the Palace, Crowned and Dangerous, On Her Majesty’s Frightfully Secret Service

This series is too unbearably easy to binge on.  I found them on one of those Audible sales where they are crafty buggers and let you have the first in a series for free.  I binged on a bunch in 2013-2014 as I was returning to feeling like myself after the entrance of a tiny little boy I made, stalling out at Queen of Hearts.

The main character, Georgiana Rannoch, is in line for the British throne in the 1930’s, too far away to actually have a chance and a poor relation to boot, but still considered aristocracy with everything that goes along with it.  She solves high society murder mysteries in the historical context of the world at that time.  So not only is it the delicious historical fiction that has me googling the people who drop into the plot line, it has a handful of very fun recurring characters who serve to up the drama, each in their own way:  a bad girl best friend, a selfish but glamorous mother, an inept lady’s maid, a reliable cockney grandfather, a horrid sister in law, and a dashing love interest.    She rarely has any money and people are always getting killed and complicating things in settings all over the world at that time and place:

Queen of Hearts is on a ship and in 1930’s Hollywood, Malice at the Palace is in the apartments of Buckingham Palace, Crowned and Dangerous is in Ireland, and most of On Her Majesty’s Frightfully Secret Service is in Italy. Georgie starts off as awkward but she is becoming more worldly and assertive as she moves through the novels, less clumsy, less shy.  Often in cozies or series the growth of the main character isn’t important, but Bowen seems to have prioritized that.  It makes Georgie more believable as a character because she is a young adult and so much change and growing up happens in that part of your life.  And with relatable flaws to make her likeable, to make you root for her to unmask the killer and save the day.

It’s a rare series for me to want to keep going, as I can get bored of the same people, but I don’t get bored of this cast of characters.  I am always amused when they show up to play their roles.

Also, these books are best enjoyed on audio. The late Katharine Kellgren was a genius with all the different voices and accents of the world at that time, even doing the men believably.  I prefer these on audio but I did devour some by reading the old fashioned way.  She brought these stories to life on audio. There won’t be another one made by Ms. Kellgren, unfortunately, but she is definitely my favorite narrator.  I think the fact I enjoy the stories so much will get me through getting used to another narrator, but I am not happy about it.

So I spent Christmas break trying to figure out mysteries for the elite in the western world of the 1930s .  It was nice for holiday down time, as I burned myself out on Christmas super early this year with the early snow and all the things we did with our son.  And I was strict about not starting with any challenges until the year actually changed over.  I am the picture of discipline.

Likes/Comments/Shares