Social Distancing Reads

Unprecedented times.  That’s what we are living in.  Hunkered down in our homes if we can afford the luxury of isolation/distancing, keeping our children close, we need solitary and distracting activities in order to not kill each other while this wave of illness has a chance to play out and die on its own. Hopefully not overwhelming our resources and really making it feel like the end of the world in the process.

I have always thought of reading as the ultimate boredom survival tool.  Even as my own brain has chosen different ways to read while I keep my hands busy, I can travel to places in books at any time, no matter where I am.  So even though I am reading through some of my YA to help with my writing goals I have decided on a special edition post of the reads I recommend to anyone trying to survive something immobilizing for indeterminate periods of time.

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The Red Tent, Anita Diamant

I read this years ago, like college age, at the behest of my mother, who always at the time knew the hottest books going.  I think this skill was partly due to her following Oprah’s book club.  It tells the story of Dinah, a minor character in the book of Genesis, and the world of women in the Biblical time in history.  We women have always been survivors and do best sticking together no matter what, even in our world of men, and this book reminds us of that.  This book stays with me and is always one of the first titles that falls from my mouth when people want book recommendations.

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The Luminaries, Eleanor Catton

This one is less of a sweeping success than The Red Tent.  It is less universally appealing, and I will start with that.  This is set in 1866 New Zealand, and a single man arrives seeking his fortune and instead gets wrapped up in a mystery involving a treasure, an attempted suicide, and a missing man.  Now, I am not going to pretend that I caught everything in this 848 page doorstop, but I found myself taken along for the ride in these interwoven tales of people living on the edge of the known world.  Allegedly this is a funny satire but I don’t think I have enough context to have found it funny. I reviewed it years back from being a snow read that had always intrigued me but I had been intimidated to try.  I would recommend you at least try to get into it, see where it takes you.  You have time, right?

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Sarah Addison Allen

I am just popping this author up there to recommend something lighter to read but still completely magical.  I have read almost everything she has done, and I have reviewed her on here not too long ago.  These stories are magical realist tales of people’s lives and fates.  Finding love.  Living in every day worlds of magical happenings.  I ate her books like candy.  I didn’t have to work for it, and after recommending a book where you generally do gotta work for it, at least a little, I felt I needed to have something listed here that is more instant gratification but you still could respect yourself.  Although self respect is overrated, especially when it comes to survival reading.

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All Souls Trilogy, Deborah Harkness

So if you really think you’re going to need to occupy lots of time, and you like magic, paranormal creatures, and historical fiction, and you want to work for it, this one is worth a whirl.  It tops out just under 1700 pages.  It’s a transporting time eater.  And now that all three are out, you can read them back to back instead of forgetting plot points before the next one comes out, like I did.  So complex.  So many interesting times in history discussed and shown.  So worth it to spend time in this world instead of ours.

I am hopeful these crazy times will pass soon.  I am hopeful that together we will flatten the curve and contain this as much as possible.  I live in New York, so there is a lot going on up here with the virus, and I work in healthcare so I am sitting in on daily meetings and might end up having to help out in other departments. But until then there are always books.  There will always be books.

Stay safe.

 

Scary Reads! Day of the Dead

I don’t know about your neck of the woods, but many towns where I live moved Trick or Treating to nights where it wouldn’t be so rainy.  Not where I live.  They declared a week back that Trick or Treating should always be Halloween, which is fine, easier to plan, but with the multitudes of Halloween activities that are had now, it’s not as if kids are living the Halloween of my day, even if they are out there in the rain.  In my day there was a parade, a Trick or Treat night,  and a bunch of ugly plastic costumes that my mother refused to buy, so we would scrap together old dance costumes and hope we didn’t have to ruin the look with wearing coats over them.  Or we dug through our parent’s old clothes and were gypsies or hippies. There weren’t the variety of nice costumes, or a hundred Trunk or Treats in daylight, or publicly hosted parties.  My son wears his costume about five times every year now to different Halloween events, and there are more I could take him to.  It’s no longer the past.  The 80s had very few things right in terms of raising kids.  It’s not the same world. If someone wants to make it so kids don’t have to tromp through the rain for candy in the dark, so be it.

I hope everyone’s Halloween was lovely.

But really what I wanted to post about was a book that made me think about the Day of the Dead, and honoring ancestors, as that holiday also passed this week on Friday.  This is the last of my Scary Reads series, which is sad, as I’ve spent weeks enjoying these books.

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Labyrinth Lost,  Zoraida Cordova

Alex, a young witch born into a Latinx family of witches (brujas and brujos) is afraid of her powers and how they have ruined her family, so when they start to manifest in earnest, she decides to do something about that.  She ends up banishing her family to the afterlife, where she needs to travel to rescue them for her mistake and accept her powers and her crazy family in the meantime. The afterlife of course has its own troubles, and then there’s the handsome mysterious boy who helps her for unclear reasons, and then the best friend who finds her way along for the ride.

This is the closest to a witch book that I get in my Scary Reads posts this year, and I didn’t read it for the witch aspect, I read it because it fit with something to honor the Day of the Dead. Her magic ceremony doesn’t happen on the day of the dead, but it has to do with family on the other side of the veil and had the feel of Latin/South American culture to give it that flavor.  She is a teen with a big family with unsolved mysteries, and she’s just a normal teen considering her impact on the world as she gets older and comes into herself. Like so many teens, she has no idea the extent of the influence she will be able to have on the world. I liked that even though she was magic she had so many normal things about her. Even her magic was a normal thing in her family, with her other two sisters having already accepted and using their powers.  I liked that, how normal she was, even though she felt that she didn’t fit in anywhere. But fitting in more becomes part of her journey. Being a teen is a teen, no matter where you are and if you are magical. The next story in the series focuses on her older sister Lula.

So, just one book this week and a good amount of my griping about people who are glorifying the way kids were raised in the 80s.

The next two months I’ll have Christmas reads, but not too early, I promise, because I haven’t even started reading those yet.  I love Christmas but I can get burned out on it.  I caught up on some reads I missed in 2018 as well as I still have a category left for Book Riot and it’s nothing graphic!  I have been binge reading a paranormal mystery series just because and I don’t know if I’ll have space to post on that.  Stuff.  Good thing I’ve had reading to get me through this year.

I’ve needed it.

Onto November!

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Scary Reads! Traversing the Veil

My son is seven today!  Happy Birthday baby boy!  Today is family stuff, presents and brownies instead of a chocolate birthday cake.  Brownies without nuts!  Because that’s how Daddy likes them and it is decidedly not Daddy’s day!  I love how being a mom has changed my heart and added dimension to my personhood.

As Halloween looms near, I think the stories that talk about when the veil between our world and the next thins out become especially relevant.   Never mind these are two books that have camped on the TBR forever and were read in the middle of the summer when I needed distraction (I read a ton this summer), but they were saved for the post that is up when the Halloween festivities begin to pick up in speed.  This week will be parties and Trick or Treat.  I already went to the big party that the YMCA has with my son every year, where you can smell other people’s bodies, scroll your phone while your kid takes a million trips through the bounce house, and get candy you’ll probably have to throw out.  Excellent.  (PS I was sarcastic long before I got pregnant).

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City of Ghosts, VE Schwab 

A young girl and her ghost best friend with experience on both sides of the veil travel to Scotland with her parents, where she encounters and has to defeat a dark supernatural force/antagonist/villain and get back to her side of the veil while she still can, all the while trying to understand her gifts and the relationship with her companion.

VE Schwab is one of my hoarded authors, where I buy numerous books before having actually read them.  This one broke the seal because it was sitting in plain view of the YA section of the library and needed me to disregard the usual reading plan I am following for blogging.  I took it home and it swept me away for two nights in the dead of winter. Yes. Perfect. As compelling as the dark antagonist was to the protagonist, Cassidy Blake. It was a quick read, being YA, and although you worried for her getting back in time and felt for the ghosts trapped in one of my favorite settings, Scotland, it didn’t get too tangled up and you knew she was going to be okay. I bet it would have scared the pants off me, though, if I was the intended age of the audience.  It was a nice taste of the author’s world building and the next one is in Paris! I’m all about ghosting in European cities that I am too anxious and busy to visit myself.  It looks like it has something to do with the catacombs, which I have been in and have always thought would be the perfect setting for a story.

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Ghost Bride, Yangsee Choo

A middle class Malay woman in the early 1900s is asked by an influential family to marry the recently dead first son.  The son who wants to marry her begins to haunt her dreams, and in an effort to get away from him ends up entering the land of the dead herself and becoming privy to the family’s tangled scandals on both sides of the grave.  Not to mention that along the way she wants to marry the nephew that will now inherit, a man she was interested in before she knew who he was.  

Full of intrigue, I kept thinking I knew where the book was going, but it always surprised me.  So much happens, especially in the beginning that I kept thinking, why is this being revealed this early on? What’s she going to do with the rest?  But the author fills the page with more and more tangles and depth to the story. For example, she meets the guy she likes but thinks he’s not of her class and can’t marry him, but then finds out that not only is he of her class, but he had been intended for her once, and she likes him and he likes her, and it’s not that far in and I’m like, well, what’s getting in the way now?  Oh, plenty got in the way. It all had to come out fast because there were so many more events based on it. In my own writing I have been trying to work on deepening my plots and fleshing them out, and I admired the way she did this.  

I have wanted to read this for years and I had been hoping that it was a book in translation, but it didn’t look like it was, but I never took it back off my kindle.  Then in a bout of BookRiot reads that got intense on me, it reached out to me from my downloaded books list. I wanted a story. I wanted to be diverted from intense themes and brought into another world.  Yes. And as I said, I kept thinking back to the similar ideas in City of Ghosts but done so differently overall, apart from the fact that one is for adults and one is YA. The afterlife lends itself to so many juicy interpretations.

She has just released The Night Tiger and it might end up jumping my reading plan because it looks at me from the library.  Don’t ask me why I still check out the library when I already have a reading plan in place. It’s led to a lot of line jumpers this year.  Shameful or shameless, I can’t decide.  

This week will feature a bonus Halloween post, as yet again I have a fitting story for the day.  Stay tuned!

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