Scary Reads! Haunted Houses II

And here we are in the first weekend of October.  My son got my husband to start decorating the house on Tuesday for the holiday.  It started with being allowed to just get out bins to see what we have to those bins being emptied and my husband further outlining his artistic vision for the venture.  Trees are changing too, more than I noticed before.

Like I said last week, the haunted houses reads were meant to scrape out the TBR.  Every year I make a list of books I already have that could get read for that season’s round and I am experiencing a certain extra level of satisfaction about putting checkmarks next to books that keep going on the list because they had not been read yet.

Spoiler alert:  TBR reading will be a big part of the blog next year.

But onto the second haunted house books post!

One of the few things I love more than a scary book that is getting crossed off the TBR is a scary epistolary book!  Piecing together the story behind a haunting lends itself well to many different sources and viewpoints being shared in the course of the novel.  Both of these haunted house books were pieced together through various viewpoints that become apparent as the novel moves forward.   Like I said in my last post, it’s about the story behind the haunting, not just the spirit activity that is enthralling.  

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The Supernatural Enhancements, Edgar Cantero

A man and his friend move into a mansion that he inherited from an uncle he didn’t know. He starts immediately with the dreams and the intense occurrences, from haunting to break ins.  They have to piece together both what is going on with the house and the secret activity that went on inside it during his uncle’s life. This has a more in depth plot than a re enacted tragedy by a ghost, it also is about a secret society that stumbles upon a wonder of the world and dedicate themselves to a game to discover its secrets and the messages it is trying to give.  Lots of twisty turns in this one to keep you guessing.

So this was on my TBR forever and kept missing the scary reads train, and I have to admit that some of it was due to not being on audio.  Books I can easily get on audio are the ones that get consumed first, especially with a cozy feel to them. But when I realized this was epistolary novel, I got right to it.  Snippets of information from everyone’s perspective is addicting to me, probably because it’s similar to my job as a child therapist that I love. No problems blowing through the backlit pages while nestled in my bed at night.  I also liked that it wasn’t just about ghosts and they find an explanation for the dreams as well as the story behind the haunting. There is a whole game, a whole secret society of the rich, a guarded secret. The characters were interesting and their relationships were ambiguous, the surprising events unfolded at a decent pace.  It was absorbing, and I let it go unread way too long.

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The Ghost Notebooks, Ben Dolnick

Nick and Hannah are recently engaged and move into a museum in upstate New York with a shady past, where Hannah has accepted a job as curator.  They move from the crowds of NYC to the isolation of a made up town near Poughkeepsie. As they live there, the woman is consumed in the house and tragedy strikes.  Her fiance becomes consumed in figuring out the details of how this museum led her to her demise.

Another one that just grabbed me and kept me going, one that I was also ambivalent about until I discovered the information comes in pieces from other sources. I actually had read half of this before having to make a drive and bought the audio with three hours to go because I didn’t want to stop reading it to drive. The mystery is compounded by the secrets that Hannah holds of her psychiatric past, and that the perspective isn’t always hers in the story. The mystery does get resolved, the layers tied up, and I always prefer that in scary stories (although we know based on my love of Ania Ahlborn that I don’t always require it). It was well written and astute.

I lived in and near Poughkeepsie for a year, and I know that it can be strangely country and isolated in some places, while being close to a giant city.  It also has its pockets of urbanity, but that’s not the setting for this story. I liked downstate. I wish I enjoyed it more while I was there, but I was distracted with figuring out the next steps of my life.  It’s an interesting setting for a story with a couple looking to change up their lives from the hustle and bustle of NYC.

The only part of this that was a little off to me was the pacing. A chunk of the action happens in the first half, and it’s not a long book so it goes along at a clip.  I didn’t expect the tragedy as soon as it came along. I knew Hannah was unraveling but she kept it fairly to herself. But then there seems to be a long stretch when Nick is trying to make sense of everything where it slows right down.  Maybe this was intentional; often, when we urgently need answers to something it can feel like moving through jello to answer our questions, especially when people are trying to protect their secrets and not allow us access to the answers we need.  I don’t regret buying an audiobook to listen to half. Love my ghosty reads, especially ones with complicated relationships and reaches into the past. Recommend this too.

Next week I will be reviewing books about supernatural creatures.  Not witches, as this year I didn’t read about them, unless you count my post about Day of the Dead for witches.   I love witches, so much I can connect to about them, but this year it ended up being ghosts and hauntings and creatures, and that deserves some love too.  It can’t  be all witchy reads!

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BookRiot: #OwnVoices from Mexico or Central America

Ugh, the last weekend in August!  I just can’t!

The last four months of the year are upon us.  In seventeen weeks, I need to meet my reading and blogging goals, and do my monthly poems and short stories, and gear up for the start of the school year and the madness that ensues.  Madness!

This is the second of the #ownvoices category from BookRiot. As with Oceania, it was deceptively difficult to find writers who were Mexican and Central American, rather than just Latin American.  I peeked to see if my Isabel Allende backlist would count for this but I don’t believe she does count.   I suppose that’s why it was chosen for a category:  a region underrepresented/overlooked in writing.

An #ownvoices book set in Mexico or Central America:

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House of Broken Angels, Luis Alberto Urrea

A 70 year old patriarch of a large Mexican American family, Big Angel, is hosting a giant birthday party for himself as he dies of cancer in his San Diego home.  Along the way, his mother dies, forcing two family gatherings, and the stories of the family members, in the book.  Like they always do, these major life events pull the family together.

This is everything you would expect from a family saga of immigration, the interwoven webs and the divides between the young and the old divided by cultures as well as by age and experience.  It was funny and poignant and sad, eye opening for us who have never had a family straddling two cultures.  Things changing through time as well as the things that stay the same.  I especially liked that Big Angel was able to save the family one last time in the end.  I thought that that was cool after the story mostly talks about his relinquishing his health and usefulness in the world.  I liked that there were still ways he was highly relevant to his family.  But no spoilers here.  Still cool.  Of course BookRiot would recommend it.

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The She Devil in the Mirror, Horatio Castellanos Moya

An upper class woman in San Salvador is trying to figure out her best friend’s murder in one sided, first person dialogue.  She becomes increasingly frenzied and paranoid as the short narrative spins itself out to its conclusion, revealing her as an unreliable narrator.

So the blurb states that it is Kafka-esque and profound, which it is, but I’m glad this wasn’t a long piece because I’m not sure for how much longer I could have stood the narrator.  Everyone seemed to be having sex with everyone else, even though this was her best friend who had passed, there was nevertheless some man trading going on and lots of commentary on such.   She was privileged, selfish and irritating.  She never had anything better to think about than everyone else’s business, which can make her interesting in moderate doses. It did give some insight into politics in San Salvador more than just the poor little rich girl thing, which is the same across cultures.  It’s still valuable, just ended at the right time.

September will be at least partly other posts than BookRiot.  All I have left are a book of nonviolent true crime, a business book, and a book of poetry published since 2014.  But the theme that has held together some of my diversion reads fit for September, so there is where they shall be posted.   And I can post on them while I’m finishing BookRiot.

I’m really doing too many things is the problem.   But I guess I’m the one responsible for that and there are worse problems to have.

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BookRiot: Manga

That picture is not me.

Memes are coming out on social media that once August comes, the New Year is rapidly following on its heels.   I hate being able to agree now with that feeling, with my son’s birthday and Halloween lumped together, but the wheels of time spin faster with every year.  Now that I’m about to have a second grader, I’m wondering where that summer went two years ago when I was anticipating my son’s transition into kindergarten and public school.

It’s only the second Sunday in August and I have some fall season reads done and noted in a file for when I'[m ready to post on them.  I cheat on my challenge books with scary reads sometimes with the justification that I can post on them later.

I used to love fall but I seem to get sad now when pumpkin spice comes out.

In anticipation of how fast the year wraps up and the other reads I do for that, August has to be packed with BookRiot.  And this time I did not hold off on the least favorite reads until after the Christmas reads were finished:  manga and comics.

It didn’t hurt that the library I crashed at for a week had a great selection of both that made this super easy.

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Black Jack Vol 2, Osamu Tezuka

This series features a genius doctor performing medical feats and miracles while having rejected holding a medical license in Japan.

I did this book in two hours on a library patio while occasionally reading in the wrong direction on a beautiful sunny day, so reading my least favorite category wasn’t terrible.  And it wasn’t a celebrity memoir, so there is that.  I tried to learn about Japanese culture and what might be so appealing about this series, as it looks very popular in Japan, as I read this.  This doctor is selfish and charges through the nose for what he does, feeling against the collective nature of Japanese society as I understand it.  Maybe that is a bit of wish fulfillment for people raised to consider others before themselves and go with the flow?  I don’t want to speak too far from my experience here, but I’m wondering if his being contrary to the general values makes him appealing.  The stories show that he has a huge and caring heart but he always dips back into his darker nature:  extortion and selfishness and being a loner.   And I mistakenly didn’t read the first one so I don’t know what the story is with that child/wife thing he has living at home that he takes care of?   That part got creepy because she is clearly emotionally a child but then acts like a jealous wife, a weird adult/child mixup that isn’t appealing.

I was interested enough in the stories, and it was a series of stories rather than one big plot line, good twists to keep you going, and you always know he’s going to beat the system and wonder how he will do it while also usually exposing ingrained societal flaws.  Entertainment and I tried to understand that culture while I was reading their popular material.

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Manga Shakespeare: Hamlet by Richard Appignanesi and Emma Vieceli

This is a straight up adaptation of Hamlet.  No changed names or details or having it in another setting or time.

So this helped the play be more accessible, but it was not the window into another culture that I was hoping it was going to be.  It just was…Hamlet.  I hadn’t done the play before, and now I better understand the references…made in my own culture.  Ha.  It wasn’t even in the Japanese direction for reading books.  So I guess in a basic way it captures the letter of the category, but not the spirit of such.  I’m glad there is a more accessible version, although I don’t think Shakespeare was ever intended to be in the white literary canon for the ages.  I don’t think that he ever intended for a woman over 400 years later to have read at least five of them that I can think of as I’m writing this.  But here we are.   I just was hoping something had been done differently with it, but also it said Manga on it, and BookRiot hadn’t recommended it specifically (like they had Black Jack) so I wanted to be sure that it fit.  And it’s my second manga for the category.   It happened, now I’ve posted, and there will be other posts this month about finishing my double dip reading challenge to follow up as I dread the cold weather coming.

Next week I’ll tackle the comic by an LGBT writer.  And I totally used what they recommended, because I hate poking around in Author bios to see if they are gay.  Feels voyeuristic.  I’ll try to enjoy these beautiful warm and green weeks.

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Summer of Shorts 2: The Bloody Chamber and What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours

Week Two in my summer of shorts.  Have I mentioned my deep and abiding love of summer?

I spent this week off, taking my son to a local camp programming robots to ease up the Mom guilt of working year round and my son asking me why I do that, and my honest response of not being able to be home all day every day and be happy.  My middle ground is taking more time off in the summer to be with him and do things with him.  I’m trying to paste together an excellent childhood for him, which would be impossible if I didn’t go to work most of the 18 years that he is with me.

I work with kids and I know that most of the memories they reference when asked what their favorite memories are are the small things.  A time when a parent showed up to something.  Day trips, sports games.  But I still want to do the most I can with the time I have.   Maybe this has amplified with the crazy developmental strides I have seen in my son this year.  Right now he’s cutting his own nails without my asking or prompting him.

But the shorts I am talking about today don’t have much to do with my pervasive mom guilt.  I enjoyed them more than the two books I reviewed in last week’s post, and they had both been long time TBR hangers, which is partly the purpose of dedicating a month of summer reading to short forms.

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The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories, Angela Carter

This is a series of re-imagined fairy tales with a decidedly Gothic and romantic/sexual spin on them.  Carter also adds a significant dash of horror in there. I can see how fairy tales are a blank slate of sorts, a skeleton plot on which to project any theme desired, spin it in any sort of way.

I like fairytale retellings, and I love a Gothic feminist spin. The tone was set by the first story, Bluebeard, which unspooled a terrible and beautiful, enchanting Gothic tale. I only listened to this on audio and it would have been helpful to have it in print form, because sometimes I didn’t know if a story had changed into a different story or the same one from another perspective/narrator.  It would have been good to check where one ended and another began in a few instances.  Sometimes the beasts felt like they overlapped.

The narration was haunting, the retelling and the new spins enchanting.  Themes of inequality between the sexes and the precarious way women had to live in those times were pervasive in the narratives.  Lots of blood in many forms:  death, first menses, virginity/sexuality.   Transporting and for how long it’s been waiting for me to devour it, it was worth the long range eyeball.

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What is Not Yours Is Not Yours, Helen Oyeyemi

A collection of tales, some that felt with a tinge of supernatural/magical realism to me (never a bad thing with me unless involving weird sexuality) all having a key involved.  The key isn’t to the same thing every time, and the key is often the entrance to another layer of story rather than the end/resolution to the story.  Keys are mentioned in the blurb but I actually had not read the blurb and I went back to it after about halfway through, maybe not even that far, noticing yet another key while listening to the narration of stories.

I feel vindicated in that other Goodreads reviewers mentioned that these tales are weird, disorienting, and would need a second pass over to collect all the bits.  It is truly a writer whose stories do that much to a reader, turn us upside down and wonder if we had missed something.  They would end abruptly too, and I would go back to my kindle version to be sure the story actually ended and another one had started.  Of course the narrators were different but often I was like wait did that one from before truly resolve enough to be considered done?   Other readers commented that the ends of the stories lacked an umph or a satisfaction for them, too, wondering if they had missed something.

Probably the story that resonated the most with me was Presence.  I don’t know if it is because the main characters are psychologists and one works with children and I could relate more in this aspect. Initially I bristled at the main character being a Psychologist but also on her third marriage and in her own treatment.  It’s not that we don’t need treatment, it just initially made me wonder why she was a little dysfunctional and in a healing profession, until Oyeyemi goes into her past as an adopted child, as well as her husband being an adopted childhood friend, and all the issues that come with that.  But then they test out a method he is using to help grieving people that ends up being haunting, weird, and capitalizing on connections that she had been missing from her life. Like I said, all the stories are a little disorienting and this one was not different, but it was also heartbreaking.

I have seen calls for submissions that want work reminiscent of Oyeyemi, and I don’t know if I have it in me as a writer to extend myself so loosely into the world like she can do. White Is For Witching was lovely but loose as well.  I do my monthly short story with the writing group I love but I haven’t been able to creep out to such dimensions.  I think I need to read more Neil Gaiman and Kelly Link, both of whose works I have sitting on my Kindle.

Summer of shorts continues into next week.  I think I could be taking more risks with my own writing of shorts.  It probably means I need to be writing more.  Isn’t that always the solution?  The hidden answer to everything?

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July: A Summer of Shorts

The long awaited summer blog special event is here!

I am taking a break from my usual BookRiot pound to dedicate the month of July to shorts.  I have a ton of collections of shorts, and every writer is made aware of the value of shorts in building his or her career, so I thought I would dedicate a month to getting through that part of the TBR as well as absorbing wisdom and artistry from the masters.

I have read a TON of short stories in my time where I have truly wondered what makes them great.  I bought a book from Writer’s Digest on how to write and understand what truly makes a good short story good, and it has helped understand the role of the element of surprise (and I’m not even done with it, so I’m sure there’s more to learn).  In the books I am reviewing today and through the month, these have surprised me but also pressed boundaries, made me rethink the mundane and the basic structures I have taken for granted, and gotten right in my face with issues facing society.

I can’t say I have exactly enjoyed reading them the whole way through, however.

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Ayiti, Roxane Gay

This is a collection of her shorts published in other places all centered on the idea of Haiti and being an immigrant from Haiti to the US, or straddling the two worlds.

I love Roxane Gay, and although I have not been good at really getting my Twitter game off the ground, I have unabashedly logged on to see what she has to say.  Like when she tweeted that she dates women because she loves herself and when she’s freaking out about Ryan Seacrest.  True to form, she gave this book five stars on Goodreads.  I admire her because she has a fast tongue with an intelligent argument always perched at the tip.  I admire her intelligence and her unapologetic intensity.

Due to these things I don’t know why I ever thought I’d get through Ayiti easily, other than the audio is less than three hours long.  I was like oh wow TBR anyway and under three hours! Done in a snap for my July of Shorts.  Right.  Some of the books I am posting on for the Halloweeny reads are breaks from this book.  Granted work has been an especial challenge this month with assuming a coordinator position in the absence of my boss, which might have also amplified the need for diversion, but Ayiti is tough.  Beautiful, but tough.  In your face with the issues that are integral to some people’s lives. A woman in one story, an MD no less, is kidnapped and trafficked on her honeymoon. The reality of poverty in Haiti still.  The difficulty in going for a better life and trying to fit into the world of the better life, going between being an American but going back to Haitian roots on vacations.  I know why BookRiot encourages people to read about the immigrant experience. So we don’t get too comfy in our white privilege seats.  It’s a great collection of stories, but they aren’t easy.  Don’t let the two hours fool you.

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The Birthday of the World and Other Stories, Ursula K. LeGuin

The late Ursula K. Le Guin has been hailed as a founder of speculative fiction, and this collection of shorts was no exception.  I noticed the stories in this collection are heavily influenced by cultural anthropology, feminism and Eastern philosophy, and I’m sure more things that I missed.  They are stories involving different family structures and inclusive of all sexual inclinations and make comments about ways that society could be set up differently.  The meaning of sexuality and inequality in these stories is what stood out to me most.

There is  no doubt that she has brilliant ideas brilliantly expressed.  And I have been scanning over Goodreads reviews by people with educational backgrounds in the very areas where she bores holes with her stories who are duly impressed.  But in some ways, this collection was not entirely for me.   I don’t know if I needed a more personal spin on stories, if they were too wide in scope for me or what. The stories were told from the point of views of individual characters, but I found myself disconnected at times, and very interested at other times with my thoughts stirred up.  At times I was ready for it to be done and at other times I wondered truly what it would be like to have a society where men were cosseted and put aside from the real world of women, or what it would be like to have four way marriages instead of two, or what it would be like to be in a world where children were not given clothes to wear until the age of seven.

It was a similar push pull that I experienced while reading A Wizard of Earthsea.

But for not even 20 hours of listening, these two books were a lot of time and work.  Effort.  Other books that were more escapism than facts of immigration, inequality and sexuality out there for all the thinking, crept in for consideration.

Maybe I just have a lot going on.

In other news my birthday was last week and in a glut of Amazon money I procured way more ebooks than a lady should ever admit to.  A true lady. I’m not one of those so I can safely say I think I bought 18.  In my defense some of them were for the seasons of holiday reads coming up, when shorts and BookRiot are taken care of.  Maybe there is no defense at all.  I did get a real bed for my dog though and I probably got one that was too small that I will have to exchange but I didn’t think of only myself.  Just mostly.

Shorts will continue at least through July.  I still need to read categories I have been procrastinating for BookRiot and I usually start racking up the scary reads in August to post on for the fall.

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Books Written about the Prison Experience

It’s the last weekend of June and it’s been an insane month of changes for me.  I am going to be taking new responsibilities at work and saying goodbye to my first boss in my adulthood career.  I have spent eleven years under his leadership and moving forward will have to figure out my own leadership dilemmas without his counsel.  Like any relationship, it had its ups and downs, but he was part of my becoming an adult in the world of adults.  I had internships and practica and jobs before the one I have now, of course, but I was always sheltered as a student or one with low responsibility.  I still have a way to go, though, in my emotional development as an adult.  Goals for myself to be the best I can be at what I do and to not compromise myself in the process.

Also, my birthday just went by and I really want to enjoy my 40’s.  I am giving myself two years for the emotional growth I need to enjoy that decade, the one that research shows that adults enjoy the most when looking back at their lives.  I’d really like to stop caring about things that don’t need my emotional energy.

It’s no surprise that after my life and the reads I’m reviewing here I went to the safety of some diversion reads.  All the actualization and growth in my life is a privilege in itself.  These books are about the transformative experience of doing time in prison.  I’m grateful that my growth experiences have not had to involve incarceration, whether from a poor choice or being gravely disadvantaged.   Like, I’ll miss my boss, but my life is and always has been a delightful array of choices and will continue to be so.

And I diverted a tiny bit from the category because they were supposed to be written in prison but they are about prison experiences, likely composed after the fact.  So I cheated a little.  I don’t think either of these were actually written in prison.  Sometimes I think that if I went to prison I’d do a lot of writing, but I think I’m assuming my privilege would extend into a situation where it would fall painfully short.

A Book Written In Prison

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The Sun Does Shine:  How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row, Anthony Ray Hinton and Laura Love Hardin

A black man in 1980’s Alabama is unjustly imprisoned and sentenced to death for a murder he did not commit.  He is eventually exonerated, but not without a grueling number of years of surviving and trying to clear his name from his extremely disadvantaged standpoint.

This was as riveting as it could be depressing.  Ray Hinton wasn’t born with much but he was likable, just trying to make it in the world before he was imprisoned, and then when he comes out of his emotional dark place to make the best of his situation and survive.  He was impoverished and loyal to his family, and got through it out of others’ undying loyalty to him, both family and when he finally found a lawyer that could get him out.  How he got tossed onto death row without the usually precursors of trauma and abuse and how he was stuck there and what he discovered about the world and about himself were all a compelling journey.  One that I was grateful to experience from the outside.

Stories about inequality, privileges, and resilience have a place in our culture and it’s no surprise to me that Oprah has featured this book.  Bad things still happen to people in this country on the basis of race, and people still hang in there in terrible situations that make most other people’s lives look pretty okay.  I’m feeling pretty white here over my sadness over a change in leadership at my work and what it means to me, the fact I have a career that I can take as far as I want.

The other prison book I read is Prison with Privilege.  Nothing like Hinton’s soul crushing years on Death Row in the Deep South, smelling other people dying and waiting for his turn.

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Orange Is the New Black:  My Year in a Women’s Prison, Piper Kerman

The title sums it up and it’s a Netflix series, so I can keep this short: Piper ran a suitcase of drug money during a less focused time in her life and had to spend 15 months in Danbury Correctional Facility when the people she worked for ratted her out when the ring was busted.

Hilariously I binge watched Season One of the Netflix series in the winter of 2013, when I had a year old baby and a husband watching football in another room.  I didn’t then appreciate the intersection of these facts to create the rare opportunity for binge watching such an adult program.  It was one of those where I could keep going once I got started but I had to be willing to face some of the cringe worthy intensity that makes the show as appealing as it is, and then I would get hooked.  I can’t do this one episode at a time.  I won’t push through the whole thing.  I can only binge it.

Since I saw the show I was going to read the book.  I knew it was dramatized for Netflix, but most of the elements I remember from Season One are in the book, just to a lesser degree of drama.  The show made me petrified of going to prison and I became paranoid for a few weeks that somehow I’d get framed into such a situation.  The book didn’t make it seem exactly appealing, but slightly less traumatizing, until she is transferred to another correctional facility to testify in court.

I’m not well versed in books written about prison experiences, but I am willing to bet that this particular book brings an element of privilege that most others don’t.  She is white, she is well educated and well loved, something she knows sets her apart from the population.  She talks about how her advantages get her through it and how she learns to use her connections to others better, rather than doing it all on her own.  Ray Hinton’s connections also get him through his harrowing experience.  Our connections and the meanings we assign to experiences are what helps us to survive.

She talks about this but I don’t think she looks down on the other prisoners. The show also tells more about the backgrounds of the prisoners to help people understand how women end up in Danbury.  The struggles that lead them there. I always feel that the world could do with more empathy and I get behind any form of entertainment that helps to grow it, especially for the disadvantaged.

So good, but so difficult.  Hopefully next week starts a new chapter of summer posts.  I’m probably reading too much.  I’m trying to keep the joy in my writing but probably avoiding it a little with my reading.

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BookRiot: Cozies!

I almost kind of cheated with this category.

I rang in the New Year bingeing on Her Royal Spyness books and feeling at the time that I could just count those as my cozies, and I could, technically, but it wouldn’t be getting around to something new that I had been meaning to read.  Of course I meant to read all the Royal Spyness goodness, but maybe something new to me that also deserved a chance.

I have also read something like 37 Nero Wolfe novels.  Some of them are already due for a re-read.

So I did read two new cozies.  Two I already owned, because reading down the backlist is also important, especially since I want to do better with newer novels (and write all the things, and have a full time job and a son etc).  Stuff.  And both of them are set in mostly arid climates, hence this week’s picture not being some saccharine springtime one (but those are my favorite, sorry not sorry).

A Cozy Mystery:

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The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency, Alexander McCall Smith

Precious Ramotswe, burned by marriage at a young age and finding herself free and with a bit of means from an inheritance, decides to start her own detective agency, the only one run by a woman in her home of Botswana.  This is not one mystery in this book but a series of small ones, one probably larger and more serious than the rest.  It’s a light-hearted book, even though the topics can be difficult:  adultery, pregnancy/child loss, and the disadvantaged status of women, crime, etc.  Of course you have to have those things if you are solving mysteries, and they are still cozy, not all of them involving death or murders.  It is one of those where the solutions are usually fairly simple and the detective herself goes out on a limb to test out her own theories.

I can see why people might pick up more in this lighthearted series with a smart woman at it’s helm.  Old world charm, likeable characters, diverting mysteries.  It was a fun read, and I blew right through it.

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The Bride Wore Dead, EM Kaplan

Josie Tucker, a struggling food writer, sets out to solve the mystery of what happened to a distant friend who died on her honeymoon at a health spa.

It says directly on the cover that this is an un-cozy, un-culinary mystery.  It’s cozy enough for my purposes, even though it is decidedly edgier than some of the cozies I have consumed and will continue to consume (let’s be honest with ourselves here). The protagonist, Josie Tucker, can be edgy, cynical and hard to read.  As cozies are usually centered around a hobby, she was a food writer but having gastrointestinal issues and needing to add other things to focus on.  She does get seriously hurt in this one, which makes it a little less cozy than some of them can be, although it’s common for the sleuth in these novels to come under attack themselves as they get closer to the truth.

I liked this book, but it was slow in places. At the beginning, when she is a stand in bridesmaid, we do get to know her major cast of friends, but there is a lot of talk at the wedding table and her learning that the wedding is largely attended by exes of the bride and talking about them.  I don’t know if these were intended to be red herrings, but she dies on the honeymoon, not at the actual wedding.  And when her friend comes over to take care of her when she is hungover, and a doctor visit about stomach issues that cannot be figured out, I feel these could have been pared down a little. I wanted to keep going, I was curious about all the plot threads, and I liked that the protagonist’s life gets a little more back on track at the end, instead of being the loose jumble that it is in the beginning.   Things change for the grumbly, sick and overheated woman we meet in the first few pages.

I’d recommend it, and maybe in her following books the movement is a little faster, as there isn’t as much setup involved.  I’d be willing to read further in.  I have book two, Dim Some, Dead Some.  I’m interested in how Josie will continue to move forward with her illness, and I like that she isn’t as sweet as other cozies can be. Also, this is a self pub but I am reading other self pubs rather than counting this one twice.

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