January is for Alice Hoffman Books

Winds of change continue to blow in this country as the new year pushes on.

It’s been mild enough for me to be able to keep getting outside, and I love how the snow is blue at dusk. My dog LOVES the weekend walks and its starting to stay light longer so I can sometimes get her out with me after sessions. My poor chickens don’t like being confined to their pen all winter but there’s nowhere to go in the yard. I feel for them. It’s too bad they can’t read to get them through this.

I’m finding that the late fall and winter are just about binge reading for me, whether it be the Snow Reads I used to do (that I kind of miss doing, honestly) or ticking down my back list.

After my Susanna Kearsley books I had a ton of Alice Hoffmans and I have enough of them read to cover me through this month of posts, and it’s mostly her older stuff. Very cool to read an author’s backlist to get a feel for their awesome growth as a writer and admire them making a career in the crazy competitive world of publishing. And she’s so lyrical and I love how she includes details to make things come to life, so it’s good for my writing as well.

Drowning Season, Alice Hoffman

A short, intergenerational family saga that centers around a family living in a compound united by the goal of keeping one of its members from drowning himself in the ocean for a few weeks every summer.  A rich family that came from nothing and how it’s individual members feel trapped in their own way, either by circumstances or love or being consistently prevented from becoming “one” with the water.   This one follows some of the same themes as the other Hoffman books I have been reading, with strained family members who don’t understand one another, and a dying matriarch, and a love somewhere in there dying to manifest.  This one does not have some of the magic that can be interwoven in her narratives.

At times I was absorbed by the narrative and trying to understand an unlikable matriarch who thinks maybe she should repent a little as cancer overtakes her body. Absorbed by the parts of her life where she was vulnerable when she was initially an ice queen.  Other times I didn’t care as much about what happens to her trapped family.  I found the part where she falls in love with the tattooed man the most interesting and how that scrap of her humanity stays with her to her dying days. This family is painfully disconnected and they only break further apart as the narrative continues, so there wasn’t that satisfying resolution.  Although if the family had suddenly truly come together it would have been entirely unrealistic and annoyed me.  

It was an okay one of her books.  Not amazing, and I think it was one of her earlier buildup ones to the mastery of her later books, just a testament to how being a writer is truly a lifelong journey into creativity.   I feel less guilty about a lackluster review when it didn’t score super high in Goodreads either. But as I said, with the context of the time in which she wrote it and still developing, I’ll take it.

Illumination Night, Alice Hoffman

Neighbors on Martha’s Vineyard intersect for about a two year span:  A teen girl coming to nurse her ailing grandmother and a young couple struggling financially and with the demands of parenthood and mental illness. The story goes between perspectives of different members of these two families and their backstories.  

Like her other older works that I have been reading through, this is more that ‘slice of life’ type writing than it is about a plot, a definite story with a beginning, middle and end.  It’s a period of interwoven lives and where they converge and diverge.  That didn’t mean I was not interested in all their individual tales and woes and intersections; I definitely was, but I am increasingly finding that her early books are something you really have to be in the mood for.  You have to be in the mood for character stories and slice of life rather than a high stakes or fast paced, twisty, diverting plot.  These books are really more about getting consumed in individual stories than they are about a unifying plot, per se.

I am not reading her novels in order, I am reading them by what I think I am in the mood for, and working down my TBR, of course, but I’m wondering when she’s going to stop writing about angry disconnected teenaged daughters from mothers that may or may not deserve it.This particular one grows up helping her grandmother and managing more responsibility, but she also goes after the married man next door and has casual sex with most of the eligible teen boys in town, stays out all night, and barely does any schoolwork. Her teen girls all over are falling for the wrong guys and having sex with them.  As this was very much not my own experience or the experiences of many teen girls I’ve worked with, she needs to flesh this out.  This book is from 1987, so way early on.  Also, the love connection she makes in the end?  There was definitely romance to it but the end of the story became a lot about a character that wasn’t big in the rest of the book.    

I did like how she managed Vonny, the young wife’s, agoraphobia and I think she does well with portraying the complications and evolutions of marriage and parenthood.  I like how Vonny’s husband is both annoyed with her agoraphobia but likes having the chance to be the hero in her eyes, even though the marriage has changed in ways he doesn’t particularly like, either, as marriages do. Vonny needs to grow up a little too, as she relates to teen girls more than she does other adult women, even though she proves herself to be a responsible parent.

So all month, like I said, will be the talented Ms. Alice. Might help get us through the snow and all the other anxiety producing things swirling about this January.

I’ve started to make progress toward getting my book off the ground in a real way. Yes, that means changes to this blog project. More to come.

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