Read Down 2020: Two DNFs off the pile!

I hope my readers aren’t totally tired of my opening this blog with rhapsodizing about the weather, but you gotta give me this one with that early March spring switchover with all of a sudden the light and the warmth I’ve been sorely missing.  Daylight savings is easier in my life now that I don’t have a small child and I love driving home when its light.   I can’t wait til the flowers start poking up and I get more green grass than brown.

And the geese are afoot.  Loud and all over the lake in front of my house, standing on the ice floes near the open water and crapping on the snow left in my yard.  That’s right, Geese, you crap on that snow.  Thx.

I have thrown myself headlong into some consuming projects, so the idea to space this out every other week ended up being a good one.  I have been replacing compulsive reading with writing projects AND I’m getting chickens (ermhagherd, there might have to be a barely book related chicken post because I haven’t gotten a  new pet in years and I’m trying something completely new AND I’m going to have a bin of cheep cheeps in my basement and I can love them!)  Still a bit cold here for them and I am getting them when I am taking time from work to spend time with them so they get to know their Mom a little.  And that’s not happening until the end of the month.

So my DNFs.  Read on to hear my excuses.  There is something so satisfying about finishing a book that has been hanging in the nether region of unfinished stories.

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The Girl with Glass Feet, Ali Shaw

A secluded archipelago features a bog that turns people to glass and mysterious insects, a bison with wings, and families with sad and dark histories.  A man finds love in a girl who is slowly turning to glass and finds out more about his father’s mysterious death, and learns to live life in the moment instead of perpetually behind his camera lens.

I started this one as a paper book that I bought when I was collecting magical realism reads that I am now making my way through, but I got partway in and stalled out. Some of it was that it was a paper book and that is the least convenient for me to read and some of it was that I was having trouble in the beginning getting the characters and the plotlines straight, and it was hard to know where everything was going.  The language is gorgeous and poetic and the setting, St. Hauda’s land, is a setting within itself, and I was intrigued by how it would turn out with a woman slowly turning to glass. Not to be defeated, I got it on audio to absorb it better and it really helped. The poetry of the language came through in listening to the story and I better unraveled who was who. I liked how the antagonist was not immediately apparent, at least to me. I didn’t expect where it ended up, as a story about a man finally deciding to live in the moment as the result of a romance, but maybe that was because it was easy to get caught up in the mystery of the setting and all the intertwined stories.  It was a good one and what I believe to be a strong example of magical realism. It renewed my interest in my magical realism reads that are sitting in paper form as well on my nightstand.

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Possession, A.S. Byatt

Two academic scholars are unraveling an old mystery of  a love affair between two fictional Victorian poets.

That is an extremely reductionist synopsis.  Holy crap.  This book is an onion.  There is commentary on Victorian life and the academic context of the time, there are politics between the more modern day academics, there is the relationship between the academics discovering the old story together and their modern lives, there are the poems by the fictional poets, there are letters to change perspectives on the story as it unfolds.  For me, this went through periods where it dragged along, and then periods where it was absolutely brilliant.  The brilliant percentage is definitely higher than the slow parts.

I wouldn’t have been able to do this without audio because of the poetry.  Some people on Goodreads stated they skipped the poems and others said that you really miss some of the points if you do that, and I would have been tempted to with big long poems stretching over the pages.  Poems and stories.  They really were integral, despite my not wanting to read them.  I tried this sucker like twice because it was on my original reading list that makes me feel well read that was released by The Independent a bunch of years ago.  (Now that I have done a lot of that list it’s really a list of books to read if you want to understand Great Britain.)   I bought it when I was still swapping used books using Bookins, before kindle books became a thing.  It sat there that long.

And I did get into it.  I did care about how it played out and the characters and shared the fascination of the discoveries of the times.  I felt the restrictions on how women could live their lives (and again refreshed my gratitude for my own freedoms).  I feel like someday I might need to read it again, as there is no way I caught everything in the story.  All the intricacies and intersecting moments between present and the past.  As I said, it is more brilliant than boring, but as far as something I could just sit and read, this was not it.  It’s a good read for a knitting project that doesn’t require every scrap of your attention.

Briefly, about my writing, I have gotten serious about querying.  I sent out 6 and have three rejections in my hot little hands, but, two of them gave me good feedback (and I paid an agent for a critique) and they are telling me to rework my opening so I am on opening rework number 3.  I may have it this time.  I also bought a course on getting an agent and got access to a paid writer’s group with some inside access which has something going on in that group DAILY.  Which is good, busy, but keeps me going with querying.  Also I’m getting an agent list, and strategies on the best way to go about querying.  It’s for real, people.  I’m done sending to editors for a bunch of reasons.

The chickens and the half marathon I’m training for will be a nice distraction.  And I’m going to cave and get through the cringey experience of getting head shots.

Comments/Likes/Shares!  I’m getting into some YA reads because of my pitching and querying my YA book, so get psyched.

 

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