Read Down 2020: Susanna Kearsley, Part I

We are twelve days in and I have bought no new books!  Formidable.

Also I found the Audible group, Hear For It, which will be awesome insurance against missing any promos.  They currently have a listen to three books by March whatever and you get 20 dollars at Amazon and everyone is posting their progress and asking questions.  I’m two deep right now, twelve days in. I guess people need incentive to listen to books?  I mean, a lot of people have posted that they have already ticked their three books off the list.  I won’t be there for another week and I am pretty dedicated to the cause.

Perhaps there are hordes who have gift subscriptions from the holidays and just need encouragement?   I always run a size audiobook, in case anyone is asking.

Anywhoodle, I have been going through my books grouping them off in how I could read them since before the New Year, and every time I do this I note that I need to get through my Susanna Kearsley books.  There was a time a few years ago where her books with companion audio were at good prices, so I picked up a lot of them before I read one.

It’s always top of the list.

She was a great way to ease through after the holiday reading and into the goals for the year.

Susanna Kearsley books were inevitable reads for me, as they incorporate strong female main characters, historical fiction with some romance with a sexy man in the past as well as some supernatural elements.  All these strong, independent women are typically also financially independent and flexible as well, end up in situations where they come in contact with the past, usually with at least one person who believes that King James should rule England by birthright and is part of the rebellion. Kearsley does pretty well in explaining this complicated historical series of events, but if you’re going to read her books, at least the ones I have read, understanding that piece of history will be helpful.  Also, I’m finding that her characters are not often raised in their family of origin in the past, but these independent past women flourish in adverse circumstances.

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The Rose Garden, Susanna Kearsley

Eva, abandoned by her sister’s early death from illness travels back to her home of Cornwall to spread her sister’s ashes, where not only does she find people she cares about trying to make a profit off their famous rose garden enough to keep the place, but also a portal in time.  The portal is unreliable, placing her at unlikely intervals in the eighteenth century, where she meets the dashing and recently widowed Daniel Butler, a smuggler and a Jacobite besides. As she slides between time periods, conveniently with her last tie to the present time recently deceased, she must decide where she truly belongs: present day that she knows or the past she feels drawn to, and where she would like to stay.  The main picture for this post is what came up when I typed Cornwall.

This book felt a little like Outlander, even though I only read the first one and she doesn’t get back into the modern era in that one, but it’s a compliment to the book that I was relating it to that one, with the research and holding to what it was really like as a woman in the past, all the freedoms we take for granted nowadays.  Eva can’t talk in front of people from the past because it’s too obvious that she is not from there and it is a dangerous time to be a woman alone in a time where she is different, which is where the tension comes from. This is even harder because Eva can’t control her time slips and is placed in situations where she could easily be found out. I wouldn’t have even thought about many of the details that Kearsley is careful to represent.

I read The Winter Sea first, a few years back, and it was a little slow, which was why I didn’t leap into the rest of the pile. This one this one dragged a little bit, too.  The tension for the modern era was only okay and I wanted the plot to move along.  And the lack of ties to the modern world was a little too convenient, I would think that a woman of her age would have already had a long term boyfriend, or a child that relies on her, or a job that’s not so easy to walk away from.  Not that I would walk into the past to live before the age of hygiene products and being allowed to read and write like I do and be a healer without being concerned I’d get hanged for witchcraft even without my son, husband, and job that might miss me.  Ha. Might. I felt this one was okay. I was surprised it wasn’t one of her earlier books.

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Mariana, Susanna Kearsley

Julia is drawn to a modern stately home since her childhood, and when she moves into it, starts slipping into her past life as Mariana, a young girl at the mercy of her family’s care.  Her home being a portal to the past presents complications as she starts to be more involved in that than her modern life and has to find a way to resolve past events to go on with the modern day life she is meant to be leading.

This one was significantly more compelling than The Winter Sea or The Rose Garden, so it surprises me it was written so much earlier than at least The Rose Garden.  It was rated the same on Goodreads, though, so maybe I’m a harsh critic. Mariana faces more adversity to overcome in this one, including a more forbidden romance than I have seen.  She not only has to save the people she cares about, she’s getting drawn into a romance with implications in the present day, implications that are a nice twist at the end. It moved along more, I liked the reincarnation idea, and the stakes felt higher and more important to me. 

Aside from the specifics of Kearsley’s books, which I have read five (and a half) of, I’m having a harder time with historical romances because they just, for the most part, do not feel realistic or feasible, and that ruins it for me.  I understand that the idea of being spirited into the past and into the arms of some dashing young man, maybe with a troubling past is a form of wish fulfillment for some women. I should read other historical romances I’ve picked up to see if I feel any less cringey (that’s right wordpress you go ahead and underline cringey) about it or willing to go along with it in other books, but men in the past were not socialized to be kind and understanding of emotions.  Rags to riches stories of a poor woman catching a rich man’s eye never truly end well, even if they do end up marrying the guy. It can’t end well. I don’t want some guy that marginally understands consent and all the money and freedoms he believes himself entitled to. This one brought it out because the romance deals with a very rich man, much higher in station than Marianna. I find this stressful, but of course I had to know how it plays out.

Next week is two more reads and I am hoping two more the week after that.  I might have to buy an audio companion to make the deadline of two weeks for the last two.  I could be underestimating my ability to read a book and a half in a two week span.  I hope I am.  I started on a different author I have had sitting on my devices forever, so there’s where the challenge is.  Spreading myself out, I guess.

I hope the mild weathered New Year has started out well for my readers.

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