BookRiot: Books by Journalists

It’s been Spring to me for two weeks now.  Finally.  It can be a little cold, no more fresh snow that lasts for more than a few hours, and my summer dresses are coming out of the bin and getting hangers again in the closet.  And my son had his first soccer practice last week, the surest sign that the warm season in here.

The momming changes with the seasons.  In so many ways.

I haven’t been focusing on longer books like I have other years because any reader of mine knows that I am trying to put in the time writing, but when I took my obligatory Spring staycation, I felt that I wanted to knock out a bigger book that I have been meaning to read as part of my BookRiot journey.  (We also know that I accidentally read a good part of In Cold Blood before I realized that Truman Capote was not in fact a journalist.  Even though the book was very journalistic.)

I found that I missed being consumed in a longer book, even though I can’t do it on a regular basis at this point. And even though I was consumed by it I was still able to write and send out some writing.  Ahh, staycation.

Glorious as it was, I missed my day job.  And I’m such a lucky person to love so many things about my life.  The luckiest I know probably.  How could I not be with the she shed post?  As I am writing this I am drinking wine in it for the first time.

But onto the books:

A Book Written by a Journalist or About Journalism:

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The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Stieg Larsson

I don’t know how much I need to recap the plot here, really, (being what, eleven years late to the game?) but a disgraced financial journalist, Mikhail Blomquist, accepts an offer to solve a fifty year old mystery of a disappearance of a young woman who was very loved by her uncle who is close to death and wants to know what happened to her.  As with any nearly 500 page tome, this book accumulates layers quickly, increasing complications for all involved.  Call in a hacker, Lisbeth Salander, with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder, make her kick some ass against the system and mix her in with the charismatic ladies man protagonist, and they are a formidable force, solving the mystery and restoring Mikhail to his former standing in his magazine, redeemed in all ways.

I admit when The New Yorker didn’t like this I was a little scared off it. If I remember correctly the writer didn’t think Salander was likeable.  I very much rooted for her, which would make sense based on my work as a Psychologist with children.  Lisbeth, with her strengths obvious to anyone willing to take a few moments with her, was someone whose corner I rushed into.  And her story pulled me in much faster than the fifty or so opening pages discussing the financial world and setting up the libel suit that Blomquist loses to set him up for his tasks in the remainder of the novel.

Winter was on its last leg on the week of my staycation but it was still standing on it, and having a story so intensely wintry helped me appreciate the weather I was having.  I loved the atmosphere of Sweden, the family compound, the family drama. I found it transporting, even when I had to keep it together to keep characters straight.  I could get through the slower political parts because I liked the town, and I liked watching Blomquist cast his spell over multiple women, including (spoiler alert) the traumatized and standoffish Salander.  I liked seeing his magic on the ladies.  I love seeing people do what they do best, and these characters were strong and clear enough to allow for that.

And I didn’t expect the outcome of the disappearance plotline.  I liked the pleasant surprise of this.  I liked how the plots interwove to keep me guessing and worried that Blomquist was painted into a corner or there was some other nefarious aspect that was not accounted for. Can you tell I don’t even get around to movies most of the time?  Unless they are kids movies.  I love to snuggle with my kid while watching one of those.

There are a few other reasons I didn’t get to this right away: I knew it started slowly, in the novel gossip that floats ones way when a big book has been out for eleven years and you just have not gotten to it.  And when it becomes a movie and you still have not prioritized it on the TBR.  Ha.  Also I was just coming out of school and focusing on either classics or the more addictive modern novels to get myself back into hobbies when this book hit shelves.

I got this out of the library as a book and also borrowed the audio, and I loved reading a crinkly covered library hardback. I loved making progress on audio and flipping pages and holding a book open with my son during his reading time.  I am a big ebook girl, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t get started on reading with the pleasures of a physical book with a presence.

I guess I assumed that since this was a trilogy the plots would be interlaced, but this seemed like a standalone, and I was interested enough to google what the caper would be in the next novel.  Which is a ringing endorsement coming from me.

It was a delicious experience to involve myself in a longer book.

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And When She Was Good, Laura Lippman

I feel as though more fiction and nonfiction is more available in my library than other genres.  If this is true and not a personal bias, I wonder if these titles just tend to get checked out more than literary fiction.  There were plenty of Laura Lippman books available on the shelves and electronically.

This particular Lippman tale is about a suburban madam, and the narrative weaves between how she got to be one in the first place, and then moving forward out of this complex corner into which she has painted herself.   I spent the time interested in how she got there and then how she was going to get out. At first I thought there was too much time spent in the narrative on the fact that she was a madam, but then I realized that that was the story.  And it was so well done, the details on how this was feasible in the modern world of taxes and accountability with business.

I would absolutely read another Lippman novel with her well researched ideas and this one had an intriguing crime plot.  Like, when the protagonist finally gets herself free it adds on another threat to her life that she has to resolve.  Such good stuff.

It makes sense that journalism can be complementary to fiction because the research needed for plots is already done in the journalism work.  It’s like psychology where every day I study and watch how people change and how they get better when they get what they need, rather than what they think that they want.  I have had to work on developing my motivations in my own writing, which isn’t as much of a stretch sometimes because of what I do.  Sometimes.  Other times I feel like I have to push to make my motivations come together.  Like I have been toying with the idea of at least outlining a mystery novel and I can’t come up with a motive for murder that I can hide behind other red herrings.  Not that I need another outlined novel.  Ha.

Novel edits are moving.  More will be written to send out to other presses to work on gathering some publishing cred.  And the dreaded months won’t be back for awhile.

Life is good.

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