For the Love of Epistolary Novels, Part 2

We have made it to March!  Where the impact of snowstorms is not as severe and there is more light to drive in!  And Spring…it’s nigh….so nigh…

I have been to Washington DC during peak cherry blossom season.  It’s even better in person.

Setting myself up to even read two of any BookRiot category feels like a lot in some of the listed ones I haven’t ventured into (like manga.  Comics are taking the place of my dreading of the celebrity memoir), but it it easier when BookRiot posts their recommendations for these.  Four is certainly too many, but here we are.  I explained in my last post their appeal to me:  the shorter chunks of chapters, the enjoyment I have always gleaned out of remote correspondence and the memories I have had falling in love over correspondence.  And even though that love didn’t work out long term, I wouldn’t have changed it.

I also blame BookRiot a little for pointing out that these two books today also fit the category and they were already on the TBR.  So I had to do it. They made me.

where'd you go, bernadette.jpg

Where’d You Go, Bernadette, Maria Semple

Now this is one of those books that I felt I saw on Amazon and Audible, like, all the time.  I don’t know if it was like, designed to catch my eye all the time or it really was always there when it first came out.   This catchy cover was also the very same one that pushed the book further down the TBR.  It does not represent the true depth of this novel, much like the horrible cover on My Brilliant Friend It’s not ugly, it just made this book look so much fluffier than it really was, like it was full of problems even my white butt would find it hard to care about.  I should have noticed the thousands of stars it got because that many stars don’t lie, and they didn’t let me down now.

Bernadette is a woman who has always been out there a little in terms of her creativity, energy and vision, and doesn’t recover from an emotional setback followed by some miscarriages.  When we meet her, we don’t know all this yet, she just looks like a funny, smart, privileged, agoraphobic stay at home Mom living in a crumbling house and eating takeout dinners nightly with her daughter and rich Microsoft programmer husband.  She plans to go to Antarctica as a reward to her gifted child and starts to unwind further as she is pushed even more past her comfort zone than her life has already done thus far.   She doesn’t spend as much of this novel physically lost as the title would suggest.  I got halfway through and she was still physically with the family.  I could tell that mentally and emotionally she was hanging out on the fringes at times but she didn’t evaporate until 60% through.  And the part I liked about that was she tried to let her daughter know where she was.  As a grownup I don’t feel nearly as accountable to other adults as I do my son.

This was compulsively readable.  I was up hours past my bedtime two nights in a row because of it.  I read it in two nights and I never touched my audio edition.  I don’t think that has ever happened in my history of audible.  It did a few things well:  I liked all the different viewpoints.  I like the depth about why she was so unhappy.  It was more than a privileged woman not getting what she wanted. I liked that her actions were reasonable when told from her perspective but also would cause alarm when her distracted, non mental health trained husband got wind of them.  The characters were believable and the reader could easily see from all of their viewpoints.  I liked the author’s knowledge of the fields discussed and the settings.  Just really well done all around.  The movie is out in a month!

attachments.jpg

Attachments, Rainbow Rowell

I have wanted to read Rainbow Rowell for awhile.  Her books look funny, contemporary and fun.  I didn’t realize until the notes at the end that Attachments is her first novel.

A man who is paid to review computer use where he works falls in love with a coworker whose email exchanges he reads with her friend at work.  Rowell’s writing is funny, insightful and sharp. The dialogue between the friends is hilarious, believable and relatable, my having been a young woman talking with friends at work like that not so long ago.  I’m older now so I don’t talk about wanting to be engaged or a mom (check and check…luckily).

My only issue with it was that she really dragged out the main character and the love interest meeting.  I felt that the story could have been shorter and still have been satisfying.  The inevitable meet up is satisfying and dramatic.  I can empathize with how her writer’s brain puzzled it out to make the meetup unexpected and dramatic and fun, and it was all of those things.  I did laundry one day while writing a scene in fits and starts trying to decide where it was going to go to make it unexpected, and I imagine she could have done the same.

Despite this one bit, the very slow burn, I would absolutely read her other work. I have Fangirl and Eleanor & Park.  If I can be as funny and as astute as she is as writer, I’d be happy with that.

Still writing away.  Still participating in my online writing groups.  And still loving my reading!

Comments/likes/shares!

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s