The YA choice for BookRiot

My hope is that when this entry is posted that it will be an unarguable Spring in the Northeast. I can’t anymore with the freezing temperatures in the morning, having to defrost my car when I get in so I can see out the windshield,  getting into the warm weather clothing stash in my closet just to see if it’s worth wearing with leggings and cardigans. The geese coming through seem to be making the best of it, although I can’t imagine dealing with this if I had gotten a break from the cold this year.  I saw them trying to expand their ice holes the other morning, kicking along the fragile sheets of ice.  I am kind of scared of geese and I think if my son ever approached one while it was eating my yard the goose would probably eat him, but I have to respect their attempts to make use of and expand the paltry amount of open water there is.

“No, geese don’t like to be petted.”

I think it’s clear to any reader of this blog that I love YA.  I will always tackle that category with relish when given the chance.   So this one required little motivation but a lot of decision making. If I was in my usual constant state of binge reading there would be fewer decisions required but when you are cherry picking books for the sliver of time you have left for them with your fervent noveling you have to be choosy.  Something you can eat alive and enjoy every moment.

The first book in a new to you YA or Middle Grade series:

 

to all the boys Ive loved before.jpg

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, Jenny Han

So the cover of this suggests something a little lighter than what this actually ended up being.  The cursive lettering, the dreamy girl writing on her bed. Not that this was a heavy read, but in a pleasant twist of events, this book really isn’t about the boys. Not at its heart.  It is about the changes when sisters grow up and their relationships change, especially when the sisters relationship is complicated by a dead mother and a smaller sister that the older two are committed to caring for in her stead.  They are sisters, they are mother and daughter, they are like coparents. There is a father but he is a physician so he is there for them when he can be. He worries about them and sometimes cooks, but he’s around enough not to make the novel’s family dysfunctional.

I am close with my sister and it was hard for me when she left to college, and she had a boyfriend who practically lived at our house at the end of her high school career, so it struck me too, although my sister didn’t try to control and parent me the way the oldest does when she goes away over the ocean (which I was completely annoyed at her for doing, given how dedicated she was to keeping her home running and how her younger sister, while capable, was hardly prepared to fill her shoes).  The twist there was though that I never had any attraction to her boyfriend and in this story the sisters are so close in age that there was some of that after she left. The boys who liked my sister were usually about four years older than I was and to a child/tween that seems eons older.  Worlds apart. Full decades, when in my thirties I married a man eleven years my senior. So that part thankfully I never had to deal with. But I liked this. It was character driven more than it was plot driven. It was about the main character Lara Jean growing up over the course of a few months and facing some of her own fears of being in a  real relationship with a boy. She kind of wants to be a kid forever, but that’s hard to do when you notice boys and they notice you.

So this is fun, I can see where it would resonate with a teenaged girl without being too fluffy or boy focused.  There are two more books that I do have some interest in reading, especially since the author leaves off with the main romance unresolved. The sister stuff has come to a resolution but you are left wondering what happens with her and the boy.  More proof to me that this book isn’t at its core about the boys. And although adults like to criticize teen girls for being ‘all about the boys’ they are usually only so when they don’t have a strong base at home and they are looking for basic emotional needs to be met instead of having fun.  Teen girls are usually still closely tied to their home. And these girls are too.

Noveling is working in its fits and starts.  I am finishing the first draft of scenes and will be getting to go back through again and revise based on the story I have found within.  Still hard, still need to be sure I make time for it this weekend, but I can see the light at the end of the tunnel as far as first draft set of scenes is concerned. Although the next draft might feel more like draft one and a half instead of a second draft because I started it ⅔ in and I am figuring out the first third of setup now.  Which wasn’t intentional, I just went with what I knew I wanted to happen and then when holes came up I backed up and added some bigger plot pieces to pull it all together. You know, brain stuff.  All of the brain stuff.

Comments/likes/shares!  Come on spring!

 

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