Christmas Reads: Love in a Castle

BookRiot’s Read Harder 2019 list was released on Wednesday!  It doesn’t matter that I am still chewing my way through 2018’s list either!  I even watched the Youtube video released and wrote it down before I could find the list I was so anxious to know what the next year’s lineup was to be.

Plotting my next year projects get me through the doldrums post Christmas and the prospect of the rest of the winter going by without all the Christmas lights twinkling on my way home from work.  Christmas lights are entirely too short lived.

I love the 2019 list.  I can’t tell you that I know how to find all of these books but it is better than the prospect of another celebrity memoir.  I am delighted to say it will be the first memoir free year in many.  Even if I hit Popsugar.

I’d rather hunt for an award winner of color, a non binary or prison author than read about white people ascending to an even more exalted status, even if white people problems will always hold a certain appeal to this Apple product loving, bangs wearing white girl.

Also white people romances in castles at Christmas, which was the intent of this post before the miracle of the new Read Harder list being released.

I lied last week when I said there are no witches in my Christmas romance lineup.  I didn’t know that Scottish time travel romances would involve a meddling magic hub in the form of a woman:

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Morna’s Legacy Christmas Novella Collection:  Scottish, Time Travel Christmas Novellas from Morna’s Legacy Series

I mean, Scotland, Christmas and time travel.  Coming from someone who enjoyed the first in the Outlander series, this was a no-brainer.  Outlander is a little more hard core on the Scottish history, which I loved in the first one but I haven’t read the rest because I heard the sex decreases and the anxiety increases, and, despite the historical accuracy of  it, it’s not enticing reading.

Morna is considerably lighter and these three books are compiled I think to appeal to a wide range of ages.   Two of the three are about older couples falling in love, kind of a second chance you really aren’t too old for this sort of thing and the other one is about traveling back in time to fix a breakup in a young couple just starting out.  Hope that last bit wasn’t a spoiler.  And they all center around the season of love and light, and being with family and finding family at Christmas.

These romances also include some mildly graphic sex, but it is love sex, not hookup sex.  It is like, soulmate sex. These are happily evers for three sets of lovers that, in the beginning, weren’t headed toward that.  It’s wish fulfillment without obstacles that are too harrowing.

All three of these stories were less than ten hours of listening on audio, and audio is always the way to go when you are listening to stories with Scottish characters. Real narrators who can do the accent but still have it understandable.   A decent price. Good background listening to a nice walk or gift wrapping.

I’d love to check out Scotland someday, even though I have heard that it is easy to underestimate how cold the place can be.

In other news, cookie baking was the seasonal activity of the weekend. And getting my husband to score me some massage gift cards for Christmas.  I wasn’t sad I didn’t have to freeze my butt off for a parade and a tree lighting like I did last weekend.

Next week is another holiday foray into a mega famous author’s works again for what I think will be the last Christmas reads post of the season.  I snuck in another read that doesn’t fit in with next week’s post but it might get tossed in anyway if I finish it in time to blog about it.  I’m really enjoying it, so I hope I finish it.

Then it’s my last two Read Harder reads.  Yes, I have three weeks to go and I haven’t finished all my reads and squeezing in the last few reads to make my Goodreads challenge goal.

gray and white castle built near a cliff
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

And I am already the cheater scoping out the internet for my 2019 plan.

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Christmas Reads: Second Chances

My small town did Christmas yesterday, with Santa at the school, a parade and a tree lighting.  It’s a tiny blip on the map so it’s nice to have such an intimate gathering of the town for the holiday.  I always thought it would be really bold of me and somehow impressive to live somewhere like NYC but I think I’m a small town girl at heart. Especially with the internet so I can buy anything I want and have it mailed to me.

Also, Snow-pocalypse has turned more into rain and I took time off from work this week to get Christmas together, shopping, wrapping, etc so I can approach the holiday happy rather than stressed.  I need to make peanut blossom cookies with my son, the peanut butter ones with the chocolate kiss on top, even though he makes no bones about just eating the chocolate.  They are my husband’s favorite holiday cookie.  I’ll decorate some pre-made cookies too with my son and we will call it Christmas.

The two Christmas books for today’s post have to do with second chances.  I didn’t choose them that way:  one was the most recent available audiobook at the library and the other was another famous author Christmas book, but as I went along, binge reading/listening as is the joys of time off, I realized they were both about second chances at love.

 

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The Christmas Train, David Baldacci

Okay, so normally I wouldn’t be attracted to Baldacci’s work and because he seems pretty mainstream I wouldn’t come across him for a reading challenge.   It’s interesting that my Christmas reads are what get me to read the mega popular authors.  I guess that makes me a nerd.

And I think this has been my favorite so far of the popular authors Christmas reads.  It was clearly written by an author that likes to layer on the conflict and mystery, with an appreciable final twist.  I notice Christmas books that are more about romance and family don’t have the same tension and twists, and many people like them that way.  But this is a Christmas book with the constant presence of a twist, an intrigue somewhere.

A man who is taking a cross country journey by train for Christmas comes across a second chance at love and connection, as well as a natural disaster and a mystery intrigue.  I binge read this sucker one night when I couldn’t sleep and I kept asking myself why there were more pages because lots of things had already happened in the story.  And I kept thinking to myself, wow, I like this more than I expected to. I could possibly pick up another Baldacci in the future.  I feel like it might be a good read/listen for traveling.  Not that I plan on traveling sans 6 year old any time soon.  But my enjoyment of it was a pleasant surprise, to be sure.

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The Christmas Star, Donna VanLiere

I posted on the previous book in this series, The Christmas Town, last week, commenting that I am kind of late to the game with book #8.  This one was shorter than The Christmas Town and it is a continuation of the stories in #8 with a new set of characters thrown in.  This was sweet and it was happy, and I liked to listen to it while binge knitting, another one of my super cool Mom hobbies. And there is a couple who is thrown together for a second chance at love, and because it’s VanLiere, it’s about family too, and love at Christmas.  I feel that is one of her jams, and it’s one of mine too.   There are the bickering old lady friends to keep it interesting and they get to bicker about wedding planning, an old British woman and an old Southern one.  No stubbornness there, right?

This one did not have the tension and the twists that Baldacci has.  I don’t know if readers who are into his thrillers would like this and vice versa, but I liked them both.  I like how Christmas reads has been a reading challenge for me in its own right.

What I am reading for next week’s post is not a leap for me at all.  It was a big ermagherd this looks great!  It doesn’t have witches, though.  I have a book of holiday shorts with witches in it.  I really do. But I am so much more likely to listen and there’s no audio available.

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Christmas Reads: Family

Happy Hannukah to those who celebrate the light in that way!

I can’t remember the last time I actually wrote a post to be published same day.  The reading is done, but I was waiting for books to come off hold to read them.  I don’t know why I thought I would be able to read them in time to post, but now that I can officially enjoy the Christmas season, I can say that I have caught the optimism of the season.  I went to the annual local parade last night.  All optimism is excused.

It’s raining on the snow and the dog we are sitting is making a serious bid for my breakfast.  The tree is twinkling and I just taught my son the joys of mopping up egg yolk with buttered toast.  As a parent I take my job of establishing a solid foundation of life hacks very seriously.  Yesterday I taught him about the crayon sharpener in the back of the crayon box.  Mind. Blown.

Last year I read my first James Patterson book in the form of The Christmas Wedding.  I don’t think its a bad idea for me to dabble in the mega popular authors via their Christmas novels, so for this post I listened to:

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Skipping Christmas, John Grisham

I remember John Grisham’s legal thrillers being the hot books when I was growing up.   I still haven’t read any of those.  It’s a hard press to get me to pick up a legal thriller, so when I found out he wrote a Christmas short (like eight years ago but I wasn’t reading Christmas books back then) it was perfect.

This is a modern day Scrooge novel.  A modern day tale of love and the meaning of Christmas. If anyone is unfamiliar with the plot, I won’t ruin it, but I wouldn’t have made the same decision at the turning point of the novel that the Kranks do.  And of course his name is Krank, because this is a tale about being a scrooge.  It was a three hour listen and I found out it was made into a Hallmark movie when I went to look up the Caramel Pie recipe mentioned, which turns out other people have done as well and there is a Pinterest recipe.  I haven’t watched it.  I thought also about watching the movie before I blogged.  Thought about it.  Probably everyone else watched it years ago and I found out once I was looking up a recipe from reading the book.  I have always been just this cool.

I liked this better that A Christmas Wedding.  Maybe because I find the premise of A Christmas Wedding annoying and not because of Patterson’s writing.

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The Christmas Town, Donna VanLiere

This was one of the few books that didn’t get caught in my library audiobook Christmas sweep last year. It is narrated by the author and I loved it.

A young woman, Lauren, who was raised in foster care, is looking for a family for Christmas.  She stumbles into a neighboring town where she is taken in by the residents there. Being a Psychologist I love me a story about attachment and love.  Not necessarily romance, and this is not a romance this time, even though I am enjoying them more than I was. I love a story about someone finding a family because Christmas is about family.  Romance with the intention of a relationship that becomes family can also be healing and wonderful, so that’s where it gets me.  I don’t care if I know all along that they will become a family, I like making sure it happens!

This is like book 8 of 9 in the series so I jumped in way late.  It looks like all of these center on the same town and the same cast of characters.  I wish I started at the beginning, but the library audiobooks started at 8, so that’s what happened.  Doesn’t mean I won’t read nine.

Christmas books continue!  I took this week off to get my Christmas anxiety under control via wrapping and mailing.  Some shopping.  And I am hoping to get myself to write during my week off.  Need to get back to it after the gap of parenting and holidays if I am going to make it into anything.

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Bust out the Christmas Reads!

Even though my family was a two weeks before Christmas get the live tree kind of family, I am now part of a fake tree up the weekend after Thanksgiving kind of family.  It confuses my son a little, who thinks Santa should come the moment the thing is up and then has to wait another month for the presents to magically appear.  Even though it always takes a month for Santa to come.

The snow is finally seasonally appropriate, however.

My elf isn’t coming out until December because I have more control over that one.  I can leisurely take my last week in November.

Also I realize that I read Christmas novels the way many watch Hallmark Christmas movies, which I didn’t even know existed until about 12 years ago in grad school when we had a roommate that put up a tree in the apartment even though no one had any kids.  I know sometimes these books get made into Christmas movies too.

The first Christmas cozy novel happened!  And I am not alone because the Christmas audiobooks at the library were already checked out. So there are some other local library patrons right now who were not judging me one bit.

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Christmas Wishes and Mistletoe Kisses, Jenny Hale

So here it is, the quintessential clean Christmas romance, a rags to riches story to warm your Christmas heart. I am enjoying the romance genre more than I did.  I can’t do the really sexy stuff, but this one was good.  And it isn’t sexy. It was predictable, the obstacles not too high for the couple to overcome to be together.  I know that low stress and predictable are requirements for some people, so if that’s you, read this.

Nick, the love interest, only had a little bit of emotional development to do to make the reader happy that they work out as a couple in the end.  He wasn’t like a super dark narcissist with an abuse history or something that you know can’t be resolved by a month of courting.   And I did like that Abbey, the main character finds more actualization than just in her getting a guy who has enough money so she doesn’t have to work or struggle. She is looking to have a business that is her true heart and calling. I am sure there are plenty of modern day wish fulfillment narratives where women marry into the kind of money that will just make her problems go away and then she can lead a life of leisure.  I say modern day because I have read plenty of classic literature where the whole point is to get to be idle, but that’s not today’s world and I, for one, am happy that it is no longer like that.

I am working on more for the Christmas season, but this is as far as I have gotten.  I have made a good dent in the shopping and planning, but not in the reading.  I made my addictive cracker toffee and earned all the praises for Thanksgiving. I read another book in the middle that didn’t get blogged about.  So those are my excuses.

More Christmas reads next week though, so stay tuned.

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It snowed too soon but at least I was reading good books

Popsugar came out with their 2019 list and I love it!  No celebrity memoirs on it!  Very little if any duplication of categories!  Popsugar might have won me back.  Very possibly.  But a quick google sweep reveals that BookRiot has not come out with theirs yet, or Modern Mrs. Darcy.  Popsugar could clinch the advantage with my planning my reading for them earlier than other lists, but I have to see.  I have to make an informed assessment.

That might be the only non book review item of this post that I am happy about.

In more depressing news:

I haven’t gotten through my Essay Anthology category yet for BookRiot 2018.  I have tried a few times to select something.  Nothing has worked yet.  I got out one from the library and I didn’t even open it before it had to be returned.  Now that it’s time for Christmas reads, I am going to be pushing it close this year.  Has anyone out there done theirs and would recommend it?  I think I need one on audio to get me rolling.

It already has snowed here considerably twice and it’s not Thanksgiving for days.  I haven’t even bought my requested dinner contribution ingredients yet and my son has already had a snow day. So spring comes sooner?  Usually we don’t get the first major snow dump until the week of or after.  My son has already gotten out on his sled, though.  Because childhood winter magic.

Goodreads is having their semifinal round of their 2018 Goodreads Choice Awards and I haven’t read any of the new books up for voting.  Not even in YA Fantasy and Science Fiction.  I slowed down my reading this year to novel, and I do have 82000 more words written than I had last year at this time, so that’s a decent tradeoff.  I’ll take it.

But still.  I got nothing to say about the new stuff this year because I didn’t read it.  Popsugar 2019 has a book you didn’t get to in 2018 and I’ll have about 15 things to read for that.  Hopefully some of them go on sale at the end of the year on Amazon, like I have won at in the past.

More specifically bookishly for me, the books reviewed today are ones I read as November deepened. They are both mystical.  Love and connection through both sides of the veil. Family tragedy and heartbreak.

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In the Blue Hour, Elizabeth Hall

I really didn’t know what to read after my magic/scary/witches binge and I wasn’t ready for the pile of Christmas cozies that have somehow found their way onto my kindle.  I accidentally tapped on this to download the audiobook and it was the perfect middle ground. Early November, to me, is the blue hour, the dusk of the year, the time when the veil between the worlds is the thinnest.  It was fitting.

A woman who loses her life partner feels that she is getting signs from him from the other side that she goes on a trip to make sense of, complete with some mystery around a medium that she befriends who encourages her to make the trip.  There is Native American mysticism and Hoodoo and questions about relying on her own intuition, with characters in there to heap on the skepticism.  It’s about a woman who has not been on her own for years finding herself and finding family.

The backstories could get repetitive at times, not only for the main character’s story, and this story does have a plot, but it has so much to say about spiritualism, a topic I love, I still really enjoyed this book.  It didn’t have just her story of belief but many others to balance out the narrative.  If you like stories about family and beliefs about the other side of the veil, it’s definitely worth the read.

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Magic Bitter, Magic Sweet, Charlie N. Holmberg

I have almost read this one about a hundred times.  I thought it would be a fun read, like her Paper Magician series.  I thought it would be diverting.

I must have read the synopsis at some point on this book and my brain turned it into something else.  She makes magic through baked goods.  How fun is that? There are lots of cozies out there centered around baking.  Should be a little cozy, right?

Nope, it was dark. It takes place in a world where there are marauders and slaves, and the main character is wandering around in the world with no memory and a ghost that starts appearing that doesn’t tell her much, and then she is bought by a cruel and unpredictable master who uses her baking for nefarious purposes.  Then the backstory comes out and that has its own darkness to it, even though it is about love in the end.  And creation.

It made me pick up The Plastic Magician, though, the fourth in the Paper Magician series. Magic Bitter, Magic Sweet may have been different from her other work, but it says something that I wanted to pick up her other book when I was done. I figure I’ll eventually get to most of her books.

So, Christmas reads are next, starting this weekend with reading when I finish The Plastic Magician.   I might have to actually buy some audiobook companions because I listened to most of my library’s last year.  Oops.  But with next Sunday officially falling in the Christmas season, it will be time to hop to.

If anyone has any help with the essay anthology category, I appreciate input.

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The Night Circus. Because NaNoWriMo

So, it’s the second full week of November and I am wondering how the NaNos are doing out there.  The ones trying to binge out over a thousand words a day on average to have a manuscript, or a good portion of one, by December.  Is it flowing? Is it a disaster?

November is a really hard month for me to be able to do NaNo.  I have never done it even though I am pretty sure I knew about it before I had a child.  It is coming off all the nuttiness of Fall and then I start to get ready now for Christmas because I like having everything bought and wrapped long before it has to go under a tree.  Occasionally cookies/Chex Mix get made as well. I wish NaNo was in February.  By that time all the extras in my life have slowed to a dead stop…holidays, son’s sports, desire/ability to go outside consistently, all that. It’s not sandwiched between two major holidays in my home with one dotted in the middle like November is.

And I know that to do NaNo you can edit, or just do daily prompts, and last year I did a ten day writing course online where you wrote little blurbs and got feedback, and I really enjoyed that.  But with being sick so much of October and the six Halloween events and his birthday that my son ended up attending, well, I made no effort to plan.  No outlines made. I have two novels needing revision but this is not the month they will be pulled back out.

A lot of organizing and purging has been happening which is awesome, but it isn’t writing.  A lot of Netflix has also been happening because of being sick and two books I read coming out as miniseries, but that one isn’t awesome.  I’m not getting the reading done that I could be.

I decided though in honor of NaNoWriMo I will review a classic NaNo creation.  One that others claim is the reason we set ourselves up for this in the first place:

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The Night Circus, Erin Morgenstern

Water for Elephants, interestingly, is also a NaNo winner, and probably more famous than The Night Circus.  Interesting they both have to do with a traveling circus in times past.  It’s too difficult in modern times, in my opinion, to just run off and join the circus.  It sounds like you’d have to pay a lot of ATM fees for rarely being near your bank.  But when times were different, it was a place where someone with few other prospects could find a life, or escape a life they weren’t looking forward to.

Morgenstern’s circus is a magical playground for two magicians, fated to battle one another to the death through creating spectacles.  They are unknowingly committed as young children and trained.  Not only the magicians but also all the performers are wrapped up in the spectacle, some unaware that they are a part of this illusionist competition.  The only ones who age are the twins born on opening night.  Otherwise no one is born or dies, like being trapped in amber while they travel the world and perform as part of a game.  The magicians find each other and have to contend with the idea that one of them has to die for the competition to be considered over.

This book reminded me of a major reason that I think I love magic books as much as I do.  Magic is inherently academic.  You spend your time learning the basics through reading, notes, and lectures, you have to give demonstrations, you can spend your whole life holed up in a small space just reading and reading and experimenting and digging for whatever magical truth or power source you’re looking for.  These magicians compete but not without tons of tutelage and study.  Sometimes I miss academia.  Other times I like casting my own magic from my reading, demonstrations, practice and tutelage.  I like feeling at times like I actually have an effect on the world.

I first read this book around the time I got married and I felt it needed to be revisited, as I didn’t remember a lot because of all the wedding stuff going on.  It was a good transition from my magic/scary reads to the rest of the variety I enjoy.   I hadn’t remembered exactly the ending from the first time and I won’t spoil it now for everyone, but it was decent. I remember reading it on the beach and letting my new husband’s dog (now gone from us) paddle around in the lake while my husband watched football with the guys who had come out to be in our wedding.  But I needed to read it again to remember the magic of the black and white circus, the performers, the followers, the boy who runs away with them.  I also listened to it this time, as a friend of mine says that she felt it was creepy on audio.  I wasn’t sure that I felt it was creepy, but I liked having the accents of the characters to listen to to make them seem more real.  It’s always one of my favorite parts of audiobooks.

NaNoWriMo likely won’t make me Sara Gruen or Erin Morgenstern or Marissa Meyer (I haven’t read her series yet, it’s taking me forever to get to) but end of the year planning and posts are in progress.

Are you doing NaNo?  How is it going?

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Wharton and McKay’s Witches in New York

I love my Scary Reads series so much that I read and posted most of the month of October before September was over.  And what a lucky thing that I did.

I got my son’s cough a week before my half marathon, and all the money and time spent training for this event was not going to be wasted on a cough, so I ran it anyway.  I was good for about week until it bloomed into what I am pretty sure was sinusitis, which is bad enough in that it is gunky, but I lost my appetite and my energy plummeted to the point where I did nothing but the bare minimum at home and at work.  I had one more race to run that I didn’t run.  I have a list of house stuff and personal projects I am trying to get through and I have late paperwork at work I have to spend time working on today.  It’s time to make serious holiday plans and prep.  I can’t believe how much energy I normally run on and it’s even harder to believe how fast it disappeared.  I went from putting down 13 mile runs to my chest hurting standing up too long. I might have fallen behind on posting if I had not already been ahead.

But I am on the other side.  I still feel like exercising won’t leave me enough energy to do my day, but I can post on what little reading has gotten done.  I didn’t even have the mental energy to focus on reading.  I binged on Netflix.  I never binge on Netflix.  No offense to people who do so to relax, but I feel it is a waste of time.

I decided to combine these two books that I read for very different reasons into the same post.  As I reflected on them, they were actually about the same thing. They both deal with women grabbing up what power they can inside and outside the confines of their lives and conventions and interestingly have two very different takes on New York City in the late 1800s.  They are both witches in their own right, if we are defining a witch as a woman who influences her world rather than being controlled by it.

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The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton

This was for BookRiot’s book you read for school but hated/never finished.  I finished this one and begrudgingly wrote a feminist critique on it for my senior project in high school. It was begrudging for many reasons:  one, I have never found a Wharton novel uplifting (I’m still not sure how I have read three of them) and two, all the seniors not in the advanced class could do their senior project on whatever they wanted.  Anything.  Any senior even in the advanced class had traditionally done whatever they wanted in other years.  My sister did hers on old time movie stars.  My class was given a list of literature to choose from and then we had to do a literary critique on it.  I don’t still have a copy of it.  I don’t remember feeling it to be, even at the time, my magnum opus.

I was still interested to revisit it twenty years later, to see what my new eyes would show me.  And to fully explain my thoughts I have to spoil the end, so if you are thinking of reading it and you don’t want to know, read it and then come back to this post.

I believe in the paper I said that May Welland/Archer was not the innocent that she would like to project, that her moves were also calculated, despite it looking on the outside that she was the innocent victim, nearly getting the short end of the stick by playing by all the rules, the lovely, quintessential affluent female, the crown jewel of NYC’s gilded age high society.

In my second run through, one almost feels badly for May, playing by all the old rules when clearly the context is changing and women are getting more freedoms, and it looks like she could be bested by a woman who personifies the new world and way of thinking.  Newland proposes to an old school version of the desirable bride, but then realizes he wants a woman who isn’t so sheltered who can be more his equal than marriages that he sees in his contemporaries.  May is the old world and Ellen is the new, and the old world, like it does, finds a way to win out.  May makes all the rules work for her when for Ellen, the old rules very much don’t.  May is powerful in her own right.  May keeps her man and Ellen decides to save her pride by returning to Europe but still living on her own terms.  She almost steals Newland in the process, but she doesn’t.  I can’t say that Ellen ends up unhappy, at least she doesn’t go back to her husband, but if the goal is to keep your man and your status, which is clearly what May wants, May wins the day.   Like she meant to all  along.  Even when she offered to release Newland from the engagement before they are married, even if she thinks it is because of feelings toward an ex.  I didn’t know at what point she figures his relationship with Ellen.  Maybe she tries to release him because of Ellen all along.  But it is a beautifully calculating and self sacrificing move.  How could Newland give that up? Guess what.  He never does.  And through her life, she clings to the conventions that worked out for her in her youth.

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The Witches of New York, Ami McKay

I read this one just because I wanted to.  I didn’t intend on a witches post because I did so many last year, but this was too compelling.  It was my dessert. And it was everything I have ever wanted in a magical novel: ghosts, magic, fortune telling, romance, some madness, NYC in the 1880s.  A young woman striking out on her own to discover a magic in herself that she never knew she had.

May Welland Archer lived in the other part of town, playing by all the rules in the center of society, while these women inhabited the fringe.  Growing up half parentless and unconventional themselves, these women are more obviously witches who perform magic and see ghosts and fortunes and help women to take control over their lives in the guise of a tea shop.  They pretend to live in the lines with a respectable business and are patronized by women of means, but they are independent and enjoy being so.

I was intrigued by the world of the very rich when I first read Wharton but I am now more intrigued by the fringes of the world than I am with the circumscribed security of the rich.  I liked the talking bird and the description of how life was lived on Blackwell’s Island, the ghosts who only allude some characters. The darkest of antagonists and more life threatening situations than challenging of the old way of doing things and the possibility of one’s husband absconding to Europe with your scandalous cousin.

We never get a peek into May Welland’s mind but I am assuming that she believed herself to be powerful by being the opposite of these women who also believe themselves to have as much control over their world as possible.  May plays and wins the game from the inside, these witches play from the outside, and even though they have different outcomes, they all are victorious in the way they want to be.   Same time, same place, different witches.  Different definitions of victory and happiness.  I wish I had been able to compare these both feminist texts when I was in high school.

I’m two books away from completing the BookRiot challenge with 8 weeks in the year to go.  The rest of the year is going to sweep right along anyway, with preparing Christmas for a small child.  And then planning my projects in a new year.

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